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Thomas
Thomas, Solicitor
Category: UK Immigration Law
Satisfied Customers: 7475
Experience:  BA (Hons), PgDip, Practising Solicitor
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Recently I have been convicted of a Felony in the united states

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Recently I have been convicted of a Felony in the united states "Conspiracy to commit federal program bribery and produce unauthorized identification" I am on a student visa and i am actually not a citizen of the united states. I was wondering will this effect me in terms if traveling to other countries weather as a student or tourist?
Hi


What sentence did you receive?

What nationality are you?

Tom
Customer: replied 3 years ago.

I am a Kuwaiti citizen. 5 year probation.

Hi,

 

It's importnant to remember that each country has it's own rules. In the UK you would obviously have to apply for a visa before you travel to the UK because you are a Kuwati citizen.

 

Basically, if you did not receive a custodial sentence then the UKBA would be able to refuse any application that you made to come to the UK within 12 months of the date of the conviction. They have the right to do this in the case of non-custodial sentences on a discretionary basis.

 

If you apply after 12 months then there is still a possibility that it may get refused though. This is because the offence involves deception in the case of the false ID. This is taken very seriously by the UKBA.

 

IN the circumstances, you would have to disclose the offence and mitigate it in your visa application. This means that you would have to explain any circumstances which existed at the time which affected your decision making process to make this poor decision. You would also have to get character references to execute sworn statements confiming that the offence is out of character for you and that you have been a trustworthy and individual character for the length of time they have known you. You would also have to give details of your rehabilitation.

 

If you do this you may still be granted visas to the UK.

 

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Kind regards,


Tom

Customer: replied 3 years ago.

That sounds about right. But does it make any difference if I have visited the UK several times before the conviction took place (Around 7-10 times) for leisure and vacation. Also, would this be the same problem in other european countries as well?

Hi

 

Yes, I think general that you will find that most other European countries will adopt a similar policy to any application that you submit under these circumstances.


You will certainly have to disclose and mitigate the conviction and do what you can to provide character references each time that you apply for a visa. It's a pain, but it's unavoidable since you have unfortunately been convicted.


Please remember to rate my answer.


Tom

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