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Thomas
Thomas, Solicitor
Category: UK Immigration Law
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Experience:  BA (Hons), PgDip, Practising Solicitor
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Thomas I am EEU citizen living in UAE (Dubai) want to get

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Thomas
I am EEU citizen living in UAE (Dubai) want to get the British citizenship ,I am currently thinking to move to UK (Wels) . when can I apply for British citizenship after one year or five years from my stay in the UK? and do I need to inform the Swedish authorities which I informed them I am relocating to Dubai and thus I am not paying taxes or get benefits in Sweden ?
Regards
Hi,

Drafting your answer now.

5 Mins.

Tom
Hi

Thanks for your patience.

In order to naturalise as a UK citizen a person must first be free of immigration time restrictions for a period of 12 months before making the application for naturasliatio. In the case of an EEA national like you this means that you must have “permanent residence” and then wait 12 months from the date you obtain PR before you apply.

Once you have both completed 5 years in the UK without being outside the UK for more than 90 days in any 12 month period then you can apply for permanent residence to confirm your right to permanently remain in the UK. Technically you receive this automatically without making an application for PR, but you should apply for confirmation of it because it is very cheap (£55.00) and it’s better than paying the more expensive fee to naturalise and finding out that there are problems with your PR status (if there are).

You can apply for PR in the way described on the following page:-
http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/eucitizens/documents-eea-nationals/applying/

Once you have PR you can apply for naturalisation 12 months later. You will need to meet the requirements on the following page in order to be eligible to apply for naturalisation:-
http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/britishcitizenship/eligibility/naturalisation/standardrequirements/
In particular you should note the residential requirement as to any time you have spent out of the country and make sure that you have not spent over the amount stipulated.

You will have to apply by completing the UKBA’s Form AN. Here is the link to the page with the form and guidance notes on completing it and what documents you will need to submit with your application:-
http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/britishcitizenship/applying/applicationtypes/naturalisation/

You will have to refer to the Swedish authorities in respect of your relocation. I would imagine that it would simply be a case of advising the tax authority in Sweden and the social service department of you relocation.

Good luck.

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Kind regards,


Tom
Customer: replied 3 years ago.

Tom


what do you mean by BOTH (Once you have both completed 5 years)

Hi

Apologies, that was a mistake. Disreagard the "both". The answer remains otherwise unamended.

Please remember to rate my answer.

Kind regards,


Tom
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