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Thomas, Solicitor
Category: UK Immigration Law
Satisfied Customers: 7434
Experience:  BA (Hons), PgDip, Practising Solicitor
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Please respond quickly! Want to visit/move to London.

This answer was rated:

I want to move to England to be in a civil partnership with my boyfriend. It will still be a few years down the road but I'm afraid my background my stop me. It is very confusing to figure out if my past convictons can be "spent" after a rehabilitation period . So can you tell me realistically if i can move there?

It has been over 5 years since I have been in any trouble 7 by time we are ready for me to move there. Can these covictions keep me from going, or will they be spent

2 x Prostitution sentence 72 days in jail

Malicious destruction of property 72 days in jail and probation

2 x False information to a police officer probation


What nationality is your partner please?

Customer: replied 3 years ago.

british citizenship by birth. if it matters I man a women and he is a man.

Customer: replied 3 years ago.
Relist: Incomplete answer.

Thanks for your patience.

Sorry for the delay in replying.

The spent period for those offences would likely be regarded as 7 years from the date of the convictions.

I would play it safe and disclose the existence of the convictions and explain them in a supporting statement. The supporting statement would advise of any mitigation which helps explain why you carried out these offences and also full details of the rehabilitation that you carried out.

In addition you should speak to persons of authority who know you well and can execute character references which confirm your good character and how you have rehabilitated yourself since you were convicted.

If you are able to do this and otherwise meet the eligibility criteria then you should probably still be okay. However, because of the slightly complicated nature of your past I really would strongly advise you to instruct a solicitor in the UK practising immigration law to draft the application and to collate all the supporting documentation which evidences your eligibility and explains your history. This really is the best advice I can give.

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Kind regards,

Customer: replied 3 years ago.

Can you tell me if UK border agency usually forgive these sort of convictions. How hard are they on popele with a bad past.


If they are satisfied that the marriage is genuine and credible then your human rights tends to get around convictions of this type.

If you do not mitigate (or perhaps even if you do) then it's possible that they will reject the application. This means that you will have to appeal to an immigration appeals tribunal where your evidence gets a much fairer hearing.

You would likely be sucessful on appeal if you are not when you intiially apply.

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