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Andrew
Andrew, Barrister
Category: UK Immigration Law
Satisfied Customers: 28
Experience:  Over 10 years specialist expertise in all aspects of Immigration Law.
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I have a new Australian passport. In my old one I have a patriality

Customer Question

I have a new Australian passport. In my old one I have a patriality certificate - I have been married to my UK husband for 40 years and resident here for 30 years with the right of abode. Can I travel and return showing the certificate in my old passport, or must I have a new certificate? (It's only 2 weeks before travelling)
Submitted: 5 years ago.
Category: UK Immigration Law
Expert:  Andrew replied 5 years ago.

Andrew :

Hello and thank you for your question.

Andrew :

I would suggest trying to get a new certificate put in your new passport before traveling. It should be relatively straight-forward for the transfer if you attend your nearest British entry clearance post in person. Further information on entitlement can be found here: http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/britishcitizenship/righttoliveinuk/commonwealthcitizens/

Andrew :

see also: http://www.ukvisas.gov.uk/en/ecg/roa

Andrew :

That provides that: ROA19 Certificates of patriality
Certificates of entitlement replaced certificates of patriality with effect from 1 January 1983.
Under section 39(8) of the British Nationality Act 1981, a certificate of patriality issued under the 1971 Act and in force before 1 January 1983 is regarded as a certificate or entitlement unless the holder has ceased to have the right of abode e.g. through renunciation, or independence legislation.

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