How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Stuart J Your Own Question
Stuart J
Stuart J, Solicitor
Category: UK Family Law
Satisfied Customers: 22444
Experience:  PGD Law. 20 years legal profession, 6 as partner in High Street practice
11292137
Type Your UK Family Law Question Here...
Stuart J is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

consent order says payments to be made and shall end on the

This answer was rated:

consent order says payments to be made and shall end on the later of the children respectivley reaching the age of 18 or ceasing full time secondary education.
daughter now left 6th form and is 18 on 7/11/13.
therefore what does this mean in practice?
son still 16 and at school.
What is daughter going to do now?
Customer: replied 3 years ago.

going to university, I will be giving her some cash direct every month outside of any consent order


 

Fulltime education is generally non advanced education.

 



education.

Non-advanced education is generally classed as a level, not University, but

there are some further education courses which are not classed as advanced.

Full-time courses can be as little as 12 hours per
week.



Advanced education
courses include: a degree, Diploma

of Higher Education (DHE), NVQ level 4 or above, BTEC Higher National

Certificate (HNC) or Higher National Diploma (HND), teacher training







'Non-advanced'
education includes

the following: GCSEs, A levels



NVQ/SVQ level 1, 2 or 3, BTEC National Diploma, National Certificate and 1st

Diploma, SCE higher grade or similar





If this was CSA it would finish at 20 or end of full time education (it used to
be 19) to take account of the fact that children go to uni.



 



After that age the child can make a
children's act application to claim support from both parents while at uni.



 



My suggestion would be to get yr solicitor to write to her telling her that under the
terms of the court order, maintenance was payable until aged 18 or until your
child left full-time education.



As the child has now left full-time education and is it going to
attend university, from now on, you will pay the money directly to the child.
It should head off her rushing to court although there is no longer any legal
aid for this and she may think twice if she has to pay the legal costs

 


Whatever you do, don't simply stop without warning.

Does that answer the question?

 



I am happy to answer specific
points.

Can I help further?



Please
don't forget to positively rate my answer service (even if it was not what you
want to hear).

If you don't rate it positively, then the site keep your deposit and I get 0
for my time. It is imperative that you give my answer a positive rating. I

t doesn't give me, "a pat on the head", "good boy" (like ebay), it is my
livelihood!

If in ratings you feel that you expected more or it only helped a little,
please ask.



I am
offline shortly until later and will pick this up then if needed



Customer: replied 3 years ago.

Hi


Was more interested in the exact interpretation of " shall end on the later of the children respectivley reaching the age of 18 or ceasing full time secondary education."


 


Thanks

I have given you the definition of full time education. Aged 18 is obvious.

What specifically do you want to know?

Stuart J, Solicitor
Category: UK Family Law
Satisfied Customers: 22444
Experience: PGD Law. 20 years legal profession, 6 as partner in High Street practice
Stuart J and 2 other UK Family Law Specialists are ready to help you
HiIn fact the answer depends on whether or not the phrase is followed by "whichever is the later"If it is not there it technically means that you can stop immediately - HOWEVER given her age is seems unlikely that she has actually finished secondary education if she intends to go to University and you may wish to check that she is in fact not doing a further yearClaire

Related UK Family Law Questions