How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Technicaldan Your Own Question
Technicaldan
Technicaldan, UK Car Mechanic
Category: UK Car
Satisfied Customers: 104
Experience:  Accredited
94166128
Type Your UK Car Question Here...
Technicaldan is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

I have an 2002 Volvo V40 1.8 Petrol (Gasolin) Engine. It is

Customer Question

I have an 2002 Volvo V40 1.8 Petrol (Gasolin) Engine. It is hard to start. When started it acts as if it is "flooded" for a while and a distinct petrol smell is coming from behind. After a bit of cuddling it runs normal. If stopped now it will normally start easy. While driving there is no problem at all. Google suggest Fuel pressure regulator is faulty, or Idle control valve is dirty/sticky. Both are quite easy to go about to change or clean. But how to pinpoint the issue so I do not waste time and money by replacing wrong parts??
Submitted: 6 months ago.
Category: UK Car
Expert:  Technicaldan replied 6 months ago.

It is hard to diagnose remotely, but on what you are saying, I seems to be a cold issue that isn't there when it is warm.

The crank sensor usually controls ignition spark and the camshaft times the injection, you say these have been attended to or checked.

Usual cold start issues when there is fuel obviously present are sometimes the ignition components, although often this highlights more just as the engine is warming up.

One thing I would consider is whether the engine coolant temperature sensor is reading correctly, ecu side not dash gauge, this controls what we used to call the 'choke' electronically.

The idle control valve would either cause it to stall or run high when running, if once it's started and going it behaves fairly well I wouldn't look too closely at it for now.

High fuel pressure could cause it, as the engine warms up and goes into closed loop it would notice via the lambda feedback and adjust it's self but I would look at the basics like spark condition, a diy plug clean up and regap might help, then get some diagnostic equipment and look at the temperature sensors readings when the engine and car has been allowed to rest for a period and compare the readings to see if one is out causing your issues.

Expert:  Technicaldan replied 6 months ago.

It is hard to diagnose remotely, but on what you are saying, I seems to be a cold issue that isn't there when it is warm.

The crank sensor usually controls ignition spark and the camshaft times the injection, you say these have been attended to or checked.

Usual cold start issues when there is fuel obviously present are sometimes the ignition components, although often this highlights more just as the engine is warming up.

One thing I would consider is whether the engine coolant temperature sensor is reading correctly, ecu side not dash gauge, this controls what we used to call the 'choke' electronically.

The idle control valve would either cause it to stall or run high when running, if once it's started and going it behaves fairly well I wouldn't look too closely at it for now.

High fuel pressure could cause it, as the engine warms up and goes into closed loop it would notice via the lambda feedback and adjust it's self but I would look at the basics like spark condition, a diy plug clean up and regap might help, then get some diagnostic equipment and look at the temperature sensors readings when the engine and car has been allowed to rest for a period and compare the readings to see if one is out causing your issues.

Customer: replied 6 months ago.
Hi, sorry that my reply is taking a while. I have ordered a diagnistic tool in order to be able to read coolant temperature as you suggested. However the device i got seem to be defective and I am waiting for a replacement. Also, When I first asked my question, I've just bought the car, and have now during the past couple of weeks gathered more presise experience of the behaviour. But I'll get more into that later when I've got some measurements, and possibly som error codes as well. I spoke on the phone with the Volvo dealers workshop yesterday. They mentioned a unit calculating camshaft position etc.? A three letter abbrivation, then the word "unit". I do not remember the abb. letters, do you have a clue what unit they think of? I'll be back again when I have some more data.

Related UK Car Questions