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Lucy, Esq.
Lucy, Esq., Lawyer
Category: Traffic Law
Satisfied Customers: 29556
Experience:  Lawyer. Former judicial law clerk. Worked for District Attorney's Office in Traffic Court.
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I have an arraigment tomorrow morning for a speeding ticket

Customer Question

I have an arraigment tomorrow morning for a speeding ticket and am not sure what to do
JA: Because traffic laws vary from place to place, can you tell me what state this is in?
Customer: Ohio
JA: Has anything been filed or reported?
Customer: What do you mean?
JA: What confuses you?
Customer: What would be filed? The court has my ticket, and I have a court date tomorrow morning
JA: Anything else you want the lawyer to know before I connect you?
Customer: No
Submitted: 5 months ago.
Category: Traffic Law
Expert:  Lucy, Esq. replied 5 months ago.

Hi,

I'm Lucy, and I'd be happy to answer your questions today.

When you go to court on a ticket, you have a few options. One is to plead not guilty and request a trial. If you do that, the judge will give you another court date, and you'll come back later. You also have the option of requesting a lower fine than that written on the ticket. That usually means you'll explain why you were speeding and ask for a break. They have discretion to cut the fine for you. You could also request that you be allowed to do community service instead of paying the fine if you have more free time than available income, or you can request to be allowed to make payments rather than giving the court a lump sum.

Ohio does offer a remedial driver training course, but it doesn't allow you to avoid points for a ticket. What happens is, after at least two points are assessed to your license, you can request to take the course. After you finish it, they raise your total allowable points to 12 in a two-year period. The course helps you if you get another ticket in the future. You can sign up now if you have prior tickets, but if not, you'd have to wait. Here is a list of approved schools:

https://services.dps.ohio.gov/DETS/public/schools

If you have any questions or concerns about my response, please reply WITHOUT RATING. It's important that you are 100% satisfied with my courtesy and professionalism. Otherwise, please rate my service positively so I am paid for the time I spend answering questions. If you are on a mobile device, you may need to scroll to the right. There is no charge for follow-up questions. Thank you.

Expert:  Lucy, Esq. replied 5 months ago.

Do you have any questions about my response?