How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Ron Z. Your Own Question
Ron Z.
Ron Z., - Toyota Tech -
Category: Toyota
Satisfied Customers: 18111
Experience:  18+yrs experience. State Inspector and Toyota Diagnostics
18617752
Type Your Toyota Question Here...
Ron Z. is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

solara: I have a 1999 Toyota Solara V6 with 146K miles. Problem:

This answer was rated:

I have a 1999 Toyota Solara V6 with 146K miles. Problem: I just put in a new battery and two days later my battery was dead. Any suggestions?
Hello! Welcome to the site! Thanks for coming! I'm Ron Z. I'm here to provide as much info and insight as I can, to best answer your question.


From what you are describing here, it sounds like you may have a problem in the Charging System. Possibly, a failing Alternator. There is a quick easy test for this, with the use of a voltage meter. With the engine running, take a voltage reading at the battery terminals. If the voltage is not between 13.2-14.4v, or fluctuates in and out of this area, the Alternator will need to be replaced. If the Alternator passes this test, turn the engine off and wait 15min. Take another reading at the battery terminals, this time with the engine off. If the voltage is anything less than 12v, the battery may have a "bad cell" and is not accepting the alternator's charge. If you do not have access to a voltage meter, most local "big chain" parts stores, like AutoZone, will run these tests for Free right in their parking lot.

If the tests prove the charging system is in good working order, than there is going to be an electrical draw in a system somewhere. This takes a bit of time and testing to find a draw. The fuses will need to be pulled one at a time while a voltage meter is connected. When the volt meter shows no draw, whatever fuse was pulled is the system that has the draw. From there, the effected system will need to be inspected looking for any electrical problems.


Customer: replied 3 years ago.
When the engine is not running the voltage at the terminals is 12.9v. When the engine is running its 14.4v. How do I hook up my meter to see if one of the fuse circuits is draining the battery?
OK. Looks like the charging system is good.

To check for a draw, you'll need to run a volt meter (set on mA) in between the NEG cable battery clamp and the NEG post on the battery. So it'll be: Battery-NEG Post-wire into meter-meter-wire out of meter-NEG battery cable. Make sure all the doors are closed, and make sure the ignition is off, key removed. If there is a reading on your meter, there is a draw. Start pulling fuses one at a time until the voltage reading drops. What ever fuse is pulled, this is the system with the draw.

Please remember the website WILL NOT automatically compensate me with a part of your deposit or from your subscription WITHOUT YOUR RATING! Please use the Rating System and *Rate My Service* if the information/advice I supplied has helped you. If you have any more questions, use the "Reply" tab – I'm always happy to answer follow-ups! Follow-ups are always FREE! Even after you rate! Thank-you!


Customer: replied 3 years ago.
At rest it's pulling .02amps. When I pull the 20amp fuse to the radio it drops to .01amps. About 6 years ago I did pull the radio out to install a 30pin iPod jack in the aux in the radio. Do you suggest I pull out the radio to see if my current draw goes away?
If that's the only fuse that creates a drop in the draw, that's got to be where the draw is from. Maybe a wire connection got rubbed through? Or a connection came loose? Unfortunately, Toyota does not specify an "acceptable" draw amount, so I can't tell you what "base line" is. But, like I say, if thats where the drop came from, it's in that system.

Please remember the website WILL NOT automatically compensate me with a part of your deposit or from your subscription WITHOUT YOUR RATING! Please use the Rating System and *Rate My Service* if the information/advice I supplied has helped you. If you have any more questions, use the "Reply" tab – I'm always happy to answer follow-ups! Follow-ups are always FREE! Even after you rate! Thank-you!


Ron Z. and 3 other Toyota Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 3 years ago.

I took the car to the dealership in last August. They could not find a problem. And the at rest battey draw was within spec. This morning I turned the ket several times. Not a sound, nothing. I hooked up a battery charger in 1 min it went from a 10Amps draw to 3 Amps. The Car started right up. It does not look like a paracidic drain problem. It may be a starter systen issue. Any suggestions?


 

If you hooked up a battery charger and the amp draw went down, this sounds like an electrical problem somewhere. If the Starter was/is faulty it should not be creating a draw. And a faulty Starter would be a faulty Starter with or without a battery charger. Unfortunately, electrical problems are unblievably hard to diagnose/find. Even harder when you can't see the vehicle and are hundreds of miles away trying to daignose through conversation. My advice at this point would be to find a good, reputable auto-electric shop in your area.
Ron Z. and 3 other Toyota Specialists are ready to help you

Related Toyota Questions