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Ron Z.
Ron Z., - Toyota Tech -
Category: Toyota
Satisfied Customers: 18224
Experience:  18+yrs experience. State Inspector and Toyota Diagnostics
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Hi. I have a 1999 Camry 2,2L We were driving in a heavy thunderstorm

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Hi. I have a 1999 Camry 2,2L We were driving in a heavy thunderstorm and the engine cut out. Would not start for about 15 minutes. Battery and starter are fine as it turns over, but would not fire. Then it started and ran fine. Next day, it was hot after a long drive, about 30 miles, it cut out while doing about 50 mph. Would not start for about 20 min, then just starts again as if nothing wrong. Same thing for several days. Short trips not a problem, but if it runs for about 20-40 min, it cut out and will not start for about 15-30 min.

I replaced the fuel filter and relays that run fuel pump etc. Engine check light came on after a later cut out and the codes said camshaft position sensor and crankshaft position sensor. I'm wondering it it could be a moisture problem since it started with the rain. Some connector I could dry or replace? Would those sensors make it cut out and not start for 20 min?
Hello! Welcome to the site! Thanks for coming! I'm Ron Z. I'm here to provide as much info and insight as I can, to best answer your question.

Can I have the actual "p-codes" that pointed to the Cam and Crank Sensors?



Customer: replied 3 years ago.

p0340 and p0335

Great, thanks!

Ok. On this vehicle, the Crankshaft Sensor is located behind the timing belt cover, so the chances of it getting wet are actually slim. This code however, can set as a by-product of a problem with the Camshaft Sensor, as these sensors work together. When one or the other fails, both codes can be set and will make the engine stall due to a lack of spark problem (as both sensors send signals to the on-board computer in relation to spark control).

So, from the symptoms you describe, I'm leaning more towards the problem being in the Camshaft Sensor rather than the Crankshaft Sensor. The Camshaft Sensor is located on the passenger's side of the engine. Inspect the electrical connector for any loose, broken or damaged wires. Remove the connector and inspect it for any signs of water intrusion. If the visual inspection checks ok, I'd replace the Camshaft Sensor.
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Customer: replied 3 years ago.

Is there something I can spray to disperse moisture in the connections, or can moisture damage it so the connectors and cables need to be replaced? Is the sensor its self a closed unit, or can it be moisture damaged?

There is a spray that will remove moisture that you can usually pick up at any local parts store. However, (and this should answer your other questions) due to the electrical nature of the Camshaft Sensor, if moisture did get in there, it more than likely did some damage to the sensor itself. If there are no burnt-looking wires (remove the electrical connector and look at the pins) more than likely, the internal electrical of the sensor is what was damaged. If there is signs of damage to the wires/connector then the harness (or "pigtail" as it's called) will need to be replaced, and I'd also replace the Sensor at the same time. If damaged was done to one side, it very well was done to the other.

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Customer: replied 3 years ago.

Turned out to be the crankshaft sensor which is not located behind a cover and is lower down and so more likely to get wet. That cost me an extra $83 and a few hours work.

Hmmmm. That's odd. On the 1999 2.2L eninge, BOTH of my repair manual sources show it behind the timing belt cover. Here's what I see:
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graphic

As you can see... both sources have it located just above the crank timing gear and behind a cover. Sorry for the inconvenience, but I can only call them as I se them!

Customer: replied 3 years ago.

Oh, interesting. It appears my vehicle is missing its timing belt cover... I had never actually noticed that before. My apologies, your advice was correct. I guess that is also why it got water damaged in the first place and why I had trouble finding it 'behind the timing belt cover'.

AHHHHH!!!! You might want to consider getting that cover!! This is VERY important!! If that timing belt gets too wet and is to slip off while the engine is "under load", like highway speeds or going uphil, etc... this WILL cause major internal engine damage because this engine is an "interferrance engine". Which means, without that timing belt being absolutely correct- engine parts will crash into each other!!