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Questions about Voyeurism Laws

Voyeurism can be a confusing concept, especially from a legal perspective. When it concerns invasion of privacy, illegal video surveillance, etc., not everyone is clear about their rights and provisions of the law. This often results in questions about voyeurism laws, penalties for voyeurism, and actions that people can take to curb it. Below are five of the most frequently questions that have been answered by Experts.

What is voyeurism?

Voyeurism is an interest in or a practice of spying on other people while they are dressing, having sex, or engaging in other intimate activities in a place where they have a reasonable expectation of privacy. Victims of voyeurism are usually unaware that they are being watched. The person who is doing the watching—known as the “voyeur”—typically engages in the act of voyeurism out of a sexual interest derived both from the act of voyeurism and because of an interest in the person/people being watched, with whom the voyeur otherwise does not interact.

As general provision of the law, voyeurism is not a crime. However, voyeurism can still have serious legal repercussions, as each state has various laws related to voyeurism. There are different civil and criminal statutes and laws related to viewing without consent, being a “Peeping Tom”, photographing, video recording, and more.

What is the recourse if a person found him/herself on a voyeur website?

Legally the person’s option is limited if he or she is being viewed, illegally photographed, or filmed in a public place and his or her identity is not revealed. But if there are any financial gains the website is making using a person’s photograph or film, then he or she can make a strong case against the site. One must first write to the administrator of the website asking them to remove the pertaining image or video from the site.

Is it possible to be photographed unknowingly at your workplace?

The common areas in your workplace are not expected to have privacy. However, locker areas and private offices have a reasonable degree of privacy. It would be a felony if you are being photographed in an area where a person is expected to have reasonable privacy and your consent is not sought beforehand.

Who is a “Peeping Tom”?

A “Peeping Tom” is a person who peeks through windows, doors, or other similar places for the purpose of spying or invading the privacy of another person. It is unlawful to peek or eavesdrop on or around the premises of other people.

What are the consequences of voyeurism?

A person committing voyeurism may face the below penalties:
• The first-time offender is guilty of misdemeanor and can be fined not more than $500 or imprisoned for not more than three years or both, upon conviction.
• For the second and subsequent offense, he or she is guilty of a felony and can be fined not less than $500 or more than $5,000 or imprisoned for not more than five years, or both.

However, it’s important to remember that many states have different laws against voyeurism.

Voyeurism is an unlawful act of invading privacy of another person for sexual gratification without the knowledge of the other person. Definitions of and laws against voyeurism differ from state to state, and many times people are unsure if they should take legal action or not. If you have any questions on voyeurism you could ask Lawyers on JustAnswer for quick and affordable answers.

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Tina
Tina, Lawyer
Category: General
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Experience:  JD, BBA Over 25 years legal and business experience.
4460311
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Tina
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JD, BBA Over 25 years legal and business experience.
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    I recently received a letter from the Division of Driver Licenses requesting that I bring to them a list of all the medications that I take. They made an appointment that I am supposed to attend, with my list in hand.
    My question is: Can the State of Florida really coerce me to appear with a list of the medications I take? In the letter telling me to appear, they say they want "to discuss your (my) ability to safely operate a motor vehicle."
    First of all, I have no idea how they know that I take any medications. I have never been pulled over for driving erratically or anything like that. I have never been questioned by any police officer or anyone at the Division of Driver Licenses for substandard driving. I have received three speeding tickets in my life (I'm 64) but none in the past five or six years. I was pulled over for speeding last year, but the officer just gave me a warning. he told me that all I had to do was send proof of insurance to a particular address within 30 days. I looked for my proof of insurance as soon as I arrived home, but I couldn't find it. Unfortunately, I forgot all about it after that. Then I received a letter stating that I owed two hundred and some dollars for not providing my proof. I paid the fine and thought that was the end of the story.
    More than a year later, my husband and I received a notice from our insurance company stating that they could no longer provide insurance for us because both my husband's and my license had been suspended! Of course, we were both shocked by that because neither of us knew that we had been driving on suspended licenses. We gathered up all the insurance information we had and went to the Driver License place. Unfortunately, we did not have the exact information the clerk wanted. I called my insurance agent while standing next to the clerk. Then he talked to the clerk to find out exactly what she needed. He then faxed the information to her, but she was not satisfied with what he faxed. This scenario played out a couple more times, but the clerk was never satisfied. All this back and forth took more than three hours on a Friday afternoon. Then the place closed, so I had to go back on Monday morning.
    Just before we left, I noticed a computer by the back door that invited customers to write comments regarding their visit that day. That was an opportunity I just could not pass up. I wrote a scathing comment about the shabby way we were treated by the clerk and how she had withheld information (that could have helped us) until the end of our visit. I did not identify her or myself. My husband thinks that someone figured out who I was and who she was from my comment. But that place was really crowded that day, and I can't believe that I was the only one to write a comment. I guess it's possible that mine was the only comment, but how would anyone connect it with me? (I just had a thought. Maybe they have a camera trained on the "comment computer.")
    Before I went back on Monday morning, I drove to my insurance agency and personally picked up the information we believed the clerk finally wanted. When I took that information in to the driving place, the driver license people were satisfied. My husband and I both paid a fine to reinstate our licenses and assumed that was the end of our troubles.
    My husband believes that the Division of Driver Licenses is now asking for the medication I take because of my scathing comments. I find that really difficult to believe but not impossible to believe. If that is the impetus for their request, wouldn't that be unfair since they did invite me to comment anonymously. Anyway, whether that is what caused them to ask for my list of medications or it is something else, can they legally do that?
    I certainly want to obey the law, but I find this request extremely intrusive. As long as I am driving safely (with medications in me), do they have a right to know what I take? It's not that I am ashamed of the medications I take or that I would never reveal that information to someone else, but my question concerns their ability to force me to comply. It makes me think that Big Brother is getting a little too nosy.
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