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Brand-new house, have a 20-A GFCI circuit in which the GFCI

Brand-new house, have a 20-A GFCI circuit in which the GFCI will go bad within a few weeks. I have replaced it now 3 times.JA: I'll do all I can to help. How long have you been dealing with this?Customer: for about 6 monthsJA: Do you plan on doing the work yourself?Customer: I am a master electrician, although not a residential electrician. so, yes I will do it myself.JA: Anything else we should know to help you best?Customer: no

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Kevin

Supervising Electrician

Diploma

4,264 satisfied customers
I am installing an LG dryer (DLEX3570) and attempting to

I am installing an LG dryer (DLEX3570) and attempting to attach the dryer cord. I picked up a GE universal 4-prong cord that will work with my outlet. The cord says that it is rated for 125/250 volts but the manual for the dryer says that it requires a 240v power cord. Is the universal power cord compatible with the dryer?

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Kevin

Supervising Electrician

Diploma

4,264 satisfied customers
I have just purchased a back up Briggs and Stratton petrol

HiI have just purchased a back up Briggs and Stratton petrol generator.The generator has 2x 240 volt/15 amp AC plug outlets (single phase I understand) and one 12volt DC plug.The maximum power is 3600 watts and continuous power is 3000 watts.The generator is earthed to the built in frame. It is pushed around like a wheelbarrow on 2 back wheels.I plan to use the generator to power my Grundfos waterpump and medium size domestic refrigerator when the mains power is down.The water pump runs on 240volts and 800watts (surge 1500 watts)I am not sure about the fridge but it is a newish power saving model.Questions:1.Do I need 2 powercords: one for each device?2. What thickness(mm2) and amp rated powercord do I need?3.What is the maximum safe length of the above powercord that I can use?4.Can a back up generator be used in rain under a gazebo with open sides to ensure ventilation?How risky is it to use a portable generator in the rain.

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Mike G.

Master Electrician

Vocational, Technical or Trade Scho

9,536 satisfied customers
Regarding Solar Panel kit wheel RV trailer. I have a 2012

Regarding Solar Panel kit for 5th wheel RV trailer. I have a 2012 Montana Mountaineer edition by Keystone. It has a 50 amp cord for use where power is available. I'll be living in it this summer off grid. I have a 8000 watt portable generator that I can use to power the A/C and microwave etc. There are 400 watt solar kits available from Renology $680 Windy Nation $630. These both have four 100 watt panels. My trailer came with two 12 volt deep cycle batteries and there is ample room to add more. Do you think I should install one of these kits or put my own system together...or should I just use the generator to charge the batteries. There is space on the roof for about 10 panels but I'm wondering why they don't use two hundred or three hundred watt panels instead. My parking area forces me to park facing north just to complicate things. I dont want panels mounted to the ground because I want to use them in various locations. Should I get brackets that allow the panels to tilt? I realize I will be getting pretty good production during the summer months only.How many batteries should I use? There are two 12v batteries in there now.Should I get more or should I replace them with 4? 6v batteries?How long does it take to recharge the batteries from 50% with the generator running?Will a 400 watt system provide enough power to live comfortably to run a tv, lap top, LED lights, radio etc?We are in the mountains about 6200 ft so the A/C will only be needed during hot spells.

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Kevin

Supervising Electrician

Diploma

4,264 satisfied customers
I need some advice about the kind of plug that I should be

Hi I'm Les. I need some advice about the kind of plug that I should be putting on thepower cord on our machines that we have started to export to the USA.Our machines are woodworking machines. These machines have a 240 volt 3 HP 3 phase motor running through an AC drive and drawing 8 AMPS and a second single phase 2 HP240 v motor on a dust collector all from the one power outlet.I have been sending the machines with a 4 blade 20 AMP Nema L15-20 plug.In some cases this plug has caused confusion. I would be keen to hear your takeon what you think about the type of type of plug I should be sending.Thank you.

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Papatrexas

General contractor

Vocational, Technical or Trade School

134 satisfied customers
We are putting a fridge into an alcove that only had shelves

We are putting a fridge into an alcove that only had shelves in it. One side of the alcove is a wall which separates it from the rest of the kitchen (the stove is closest to that wall). The contractor wants to just put a hole through that wall to run the fridge power cord thru so that it'll plug into the same outlet that's behind the stove. Even if he puts fancy access covers on either side of the hole, this doesn't sound like it's up to code. I think he needs to have a real electrician put a new outlet in the alcove. Correct or not? Is there any other solution that would hide the cord and wouldn't require installing an outlet?

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Kevin

Supervising Electrician

Diploma

4,264 satisfied customers
There is a 3 way exchange that you will need to read

There is a 3 way exchange that you will need to read for the context. What I need to know is: Will a transformer step up my voltage from 208v adequately enough for me to run my 220v espresso machine at, or very close to, 220v without making the espresso machine "work hard" to draw the power as Tim says? If so, which transformer would you recommend? Who is wrong and right, Tommy or Tim?MEI have a cafe space that has 200 amp 120/208v 3 phase 4 wire electricity. My espresso machine is rated to run on 220v single phase, 50/60 hz, 40 amp max draw, with a 50 amp cord plug rating. I will be hiring an electrician for this, but what will need to be done to get the correct electricityto the espresso machine and how much of my 200 amps will be taken by the machine after the conversion?TOMMYThe machine is rated at 40 amps, so he will be using a 40 amp double pole breaker to connect to a transformer which will increase the voltage from 208 single phase to 220 volts single phase. You might verify the machines nameplate, as some are dual rated for 208/230 volts. If so, it will be stamped on the metal nameplate. Since it is rated for 50/60hz, I would think it has a good chance of dual voltage rating, but not guaranteed. Check the nameplate to confirm. Increasing the voltage with a transformer to run the machine, uses no more electricity than wiring it direct if it was 208 volts, it uses the exact same power.METhank you Tommy. Can you give me a link to an example of a transformer that I will need? Will I also be able to run appliances rated for 110/120v directly from the panel, or will they also need a transformer?TOMMYYour appliances will have the 120 volts available, that is why you have the 120/208. The 120 portion is convenience receptacles and lighting. The 208 is for large equipment. I do have to make a small correction. The machine uses 40 amp breaker on 220 volts, so the 208 side will be a little higher to power the transformer with the lower voltage, but only at 48 amps, so they will have to put a 50 amp breaker in the panel and it will serve the transformer to supply the higher voltage at 40 amp.You will need a 1 KVA Buck Boost transformerSaves money over using a standard isolation transformer, since you only need to Boost the voltage a small amount(Interjection from ME in the present: I took this all to mean that yes, I could step up the voltage from 208 to 220 using a transformer. However when I got a bid from an electrician recently, he tells me a different story)ME (speaking to TIM this time)My understanding (which could be wrong) is that the transformer will allow us to run 220v and/or 240v appliances. I put this issue to an electrician on a service called JustAnswer.com and he gave me this answer (I show him the exchange I had with TOMMY from above, then ask) The espresso machine, for example, wants 220v. It is not designed to run on 208v. The transformer will allow you to step up the voltage to 220v for that specific circuit to run at 220v. Is that correct? If my understanding is correct, and the transformer will step up the voltage to 220v, why would we need to be concerned with equipment running at 208v? Can we use the transformer to step up all circuits that we need to run at 220v?TIMNo the transformer will deliver from the main service, which is 277-480 to 120/208. So if your espresso is rated 240, it's going to work harder to operate efficiently as designed at 240 volt , therefore it's better to have one designed to operate efficiently at 208 voltageMEThat makes sense when I take that information by itself. But in Tommy's answer to my question he either contradicts that or I just don't understand it correctly. When he says "The machine uses 40 amp breaker on 220 volts, so the 208 side will be a little higher to power the transformer with the lower voltage, but only at 48 amps, so they will have to put a 50 amp breaker in the panel and it will serve the transformer to supply the higher voltage at 40 amp." Doesn't that mean that the transformer is doing the hard work so that the espresso machine doesn't need to?TIMI think it means that the machine is trying harder but the voltage just isn't there. I do see what he means but slightly disagree. The voltage is the voltage that does not change, but I think what he's trying to say is that the machine will overcompensate the voltage by drawing more amperage, so instead of using 30 amps at 240 volts, you've made the machine stop at 208 volts, so to make up it uses more amperage or power, say 40 amps. Ultimately, get equipment that runs on 208. Most of them run on a range of voltage, which makes this conversation a moot point. Just check with the MFG. that's all. It's not this big deal, trust me.Back to ME from the present: The espresso machine is not designed to run on 208.

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Phil

Consultant to Engrs, Govt & Contractors

Degree, Mech Engr Technology

9,902 satisfied customers
This is a commercial electrical question.I have a

Hello, this is a commercial electrical question.I have a medical equipment that's hooked up to a 4 pronged 240v outlet. The equipment has a label by the power cord stating that it requires 240V, 60hz, 30 amps.Long story short, we called the service guy for the equipment and he said that the outlet is faulty and that we need to call an electrician. He didn't state exactly what the problem is.I'd like to say that I'm very handy. I've rewired, installed new fixtures, and found open/shorts to circuits to friends, and neighbor's house in the past.I measured the voltages against the 4 prongs (all possible combinations) and in summary, depending on which two prongs you touch, I am getting 120V and I'm getting 212V (or 0v). However, when I measure the frequency/hertz, one of the hot wires was not reading 60hz (it was fluctuating between 200-300 hz).I have a 200 amp electrical panel that has 3 power lines coming into it. I took a frequency reading from each of the 3 power lines to ground and one of the three power line fluctuates between 200-300 hertzs, the other two reads 60 hz. I then measured the next two slots below when the existing breaker for the equipment sits and they both read 60 hz (I'm guessing it's because they go to the two power lines that reads 60hz). Btw, the frequency reading for two slots where the breaker for the equip currently sits reads - 60hz, the other fluctuates between 200-300 hz.So.... Naturally, to solve the problem I moved the 50 amp breaker down a slot and now it's reading 60 hz at the outlet (for all hot wires) and 120v or 212V (depending on which wires you measure against).My question is:- Is it normal to be getting a reading of 212V instead of 240V at a 240V outlet? (btw, I took measurements numerous times and never get a reading of 240V plus/minus 10V (i.e. 230v or 250v or even 230v)- What is typically wrong when one of the three power lines is producing an abnormal frequency (other than 60hz)?- Shouldn't all AC outlets be reading 60hz no matter what voltage it is?- The fluctuating frequency at one of the 3 power lines feeding the panel, could it be because the panel is bad? Or the fault is one the power company side and I should reach out to them to fix it?

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Kevin

Supervising Electrician

Diploma

4,264 satisfied customers
I want to replace a kitchen trash compactor, but when I pulled

I want to replace a kitchen trash compactor, but when I pulled it out from under the cabinet I noticed the power cord disappears down into the floor through a hole sealed with spray foam. The previous owner must have remodeled and ran the cord down to link up with an electrical box or line somewhere else, obviously not thinking about how he might replace the appliance one day. Option one is to cut open the floor and trace all the connections and maybe install an actual outlet under the counter for this appliance. Option 2 is to simply cut the existing cord and splice it with the power cord of the replacement compactor and leave whatever is unseen untouched. This compactor has worked fine for the 4 years I've lived in the house and I'm buying a used replacement off Craigslist, so I'm not concerned about cutting the cord on the new one and any kind of warranty etc.

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Kevin

Supervising Electrician

Diploma

4,264 satisfied customers
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