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I need help figuring out an electrical circuit. I am

I need help figuring out an electrical circuit. I am building a rain barrel with a water pump. I have a 12v 7amp battery powering a 12v 7amp pump. That part all works great. I'd like to install a float switch on the bottom of the barrel to interrupt the power to the pump when the water gets low so the pump will not continue to run dry. I blew out the first float switch (max switching current is .5amp, max load carry is 1amp) - apparently I needed to add a relay. I now have a relay but can't figure out where or how to put the relay and float switch into the circuit. Can someone give me a hand on this? It exceeds my very basic electronics understanding.

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Steven Parent

Journeymen Electrician

Electrical Journeyman Certificate

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I have a siemens 45cg20ag relay controlling a well pump with

I have a siemens 45cg20ag relay controlling a well pump with a float switch. But the relay is just humming and not switching on the well pump. Has the relay failed?

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Kevin

Supervising Electrician

Diploma

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Sir Sparks Are you familiar with the Schneider LC1D12M7

Sir Sparks my name is***** you familiar with the Schneider LC1D12M7 contactor? If so how would a DIYer go about connecting a float switch (2 leads), and a 220V pump with a pressure switch to the contactor. Main is 220V.

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Steve G.

Chief Engineer

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Greetings, I'm putting in a basement bathroom and kitchenette,

Greetings, I'm putting in a basement bathroom and kitchenette, and I'm trying to make sure I'm not missing anything or under/over calculating the load and circuits I need.I have2 X GFCI outlets, 1 kitchen 1 bathroom i have a 20 amp breaker dedicated to this1 x bathroom fan and light1 x bathroom vanity light1 overhead kitchen light1 outlet fridge, (not purchased yet)1 outlet outlet ejector, (works like same as a sump pump, starts when float switch triggers) 10.2 ampsSo the Gfci's get their own circuit. Am I going to need a separate circuit to the ejector and can I consolidate everything else, (i.e. lights, fridge, microwave)? Thanks

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Jason

Lead Service Technician

Associate Degree

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Hello-- I just had replaced a float switch in my cistern .

Hello-- I just had replaced a float switch in my cistern . We use a tork E series digital timer that automatically goes on from 12 mn to 6am. Weekly I check water levels and once in a while I want to switch to manual. this am after pressing MOde so it would display MAN I then pressed OVR and NOthing happened. there is approx 700 gal of water and it holds 1800. I am wondering why I was unable to activate the pump manually?

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AssuredElectrical

Electrical Contractor

High School or GED

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I have a Xantrex XPower 1500 Portable battery pack...and a

I have a Xantrex XPower 1500 Portable battery pack...and a 1/3 HP Sump Pump. TO date, the battery pack works great with the sump pump but I have to manually plug the pump into the battery pack during a power outage. I"m looking for an automatic transfer switch to use and I can't seem to find one on it's own! Any help would be appreciated!

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Kevin

Supervising Electrician

Diploma

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4,118 satisfied customers
Should plumbing that can possibly leak be directly above an

Should plumbing that can possibly leak be directly above an electrical box? I've just had a new furnace installed but no P-trap and no overflow PVC were installed. Please paste the following DropBox link into the URL field and hit return to see what it currently looks like... https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/79073930/IMG_20140709_110715033.jpg The PVC line in the middle of the pic is from the primary A/C drain, the PVC stub sticking up is from the secondary (overflow) A/C drain, and the short PVC line at the bottom right is for the condensate from the furnace - they all lead to the condensate pump at the bottom right. When we tested the furnace, its pipe leaked. It has been re-sealed and does not drip, but it proves water can leak from these lines.The contractor is coming back to install a cleanout, P-trap, and vent for the primary condensate drain and to run PVC from the secondary condensate drain (the one on the right - so it will have to run behind the primary). Notice the current PVC makes a 90 degree turn directly above a switch/outlet box.So the question can be divided into two parts. First, would it be better for the PVC to be routed around the space directly above the switch/outlet box when the contractor re-does it? I know code says the following about plumbing and electrical PANELS... "Dedicated Electrical Space- The space equal to the width and depth of the equipment and extending from the floor to a height of 6 feet above the equipment or to the structual ceiling, whichever is lower, shall be dedicated to the electrical installation. No piping,ducts, leak protection apparatus, or other equipment foreign to the electrical installation shall be located in this zone" ( http://www.nachi.org/forum/f19/waste-line-over-panel-box-48602/#ixzz38Jxdam1c). There's not as much current running through a single switch/outlet as a panel, but it seems like the idea would similar - don't put something that might leak above something with electrical current. So, would you route the PVC condensate lines above the switch/outlet like the current set up or would you change the route a few inches so that they are not directly above the switch/outlet?If you would re-route, please read on...If the two new PVC drain lines should not be directly above the electrical, this would require them to follow a path similar to what you currently see toward the condensate pump, but suspended a couple inches in front of the plane of the furnace cabinet below (but still above it so the door can open) so that when they reach the space above the switch/outlet they are not directly above it and after the 90 is made they are to the right of it half an inch or so. About a foot after the 90 the primary would have to go back to the side of the cabinet because its entry to the condensate pump is right next to the cabinet. I'm guessing the overflow could just make a turn to the right after the primary turns down, extend an inch beyond where the pump is below, and the water could fall the four feet to the floor (it's an unfinished basement).I read "Good strapping is important to prevent sags, as sags lead to clogging" in an article about HVAC condensate ( http://www.ashireporter.org/HomeInspection/Articles/Let-s-Concentrate-on-Condensate/1648 ). So the second part of the question is... If the condensate PVC should be a few inches in front of and to the right of the cabinet it'll essentially be suspended in air rather than attached to the cabinet by screwed in metal supports that currently hold it tightly to the cabinet - should it be supported somehow in front (about a 2 foot run) and after it makes it makes the 90 (there will be about a foot suspended before it will turn back to the cabinet) or will the three feet of unsupported PVC be supported well enough by the vertical length (the last leg of the primary) that will be securely tied to the side of the furnace and lead to the condensation pump?Thank you very much!Bruce

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AssuredElectrical

Electrical Contractor

High School or GED

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4,182 satisfied customers
I just replaced my 1/3 motor sump pump, but because the last

I just replaced my 1/3 motor sump pump, but because the last time it was installed the wires were only buried in the ground and our dogs like to dig in that area. I cut the two plugs off the end and I'm trying to wire both cords into one plug. the plug for the switch has a neutral and a hot wire and the plug for the pump has a neutral, hot and ground wire.I bought a 15amp 125 VAC plug and wired all the neutrals and hot wires together and the ground to the correct terminals, but it keeps breaking the GFI when I plug it in. Can I do what I think I can do connecting both cords into one plug?

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machinc

Retired

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1,606 satisfied customers
I want to wire two tanks with pumps and float switches.The

I want to wire two tanks with pumps and float switches.The datasheet for the two 110 VAC submersible pumps (model# XXXXX) say they use 0.22 amps. Other information says 26.5 watts.The specifications for the float switches are:contact rating 10 watts maxswitching voltage 110VDCswitching current 0.5 amps maxbreakdown volatage 220VDC maxcarry current 1 amp maxcontact resistance 100 ohms maxAre relays required or can I use the float switches directly?Can you provide a wiring diagram? Here is what I want it to do:Tank A pumps into Tank B.Tank A has a float switch that turns off Pump A when the Tank A level is LOW.Tank B has a float switch that turns off Pump B when the Tank B level is LOW.Tank B has a float switch that turns off Pump A when the Tank B level is HIGH.Thanks.

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Steve G.

Chief Engineer

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12,832 satisfied customers
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