How JustAnswer Works:

  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

Ask an OB GYN Doctor

Dr. C.
Dr. C., Board Certified
Category: General
Satisfied Customers: 1639
Experience:  29 years of experience and an award-winning educator.
54412793
Type Your OB GYN Question Here...
characters left:
3 OB GYN Doctors are Online Now

JustAnswer in the News:

 
 
 
Ask-a-doc Web sites: If you've got a quick question, you can try to get an answer from sites that say they have various specialists on hand to give quick answers... Justanswer.com.
JustAnswer.com...has seen a spike since October in legal questions from readers about layoffs, unemployment and severance.
Web sites like justanswer.com/legal
...leave nothing to chance.
Traffic on JustAnswer rose 14 percent...and had nearly 400,000 page views in 30 days...inquiries related to stress, high blood pressure, drinking and heart pain jumped 33 percent.
Tory Johnson, GMA Workplace Contributor, discusses work-from-home jobs, such as JustAnswer in which verified Experts answer people’s questions.
I will tell you that...the things you have to go through to be an Expert are quite rigorous.
 
 
 

What Customers are Saying:

 
 
 
  • Wonderful service, prompt, efficient, and accurate. Couldn't have asked for more. I cannot thank you enough for your help. Mary C. Freshfield, Liverpool, UK
< Last | Next >
  • Wonderful service, prompt, efficient, and accurate. Couldn't have asked for more. I cannot thank you enough for your help. Mary C. Freshfield, Liverpool, UK
  • This expert is wonderful. They truly know what they are talking about, and they actually care about you. They really helped put my nerves at ease. Thank you so much!!!! Alex Los Angeles, CA
  • Thank you for all your help. It is nice to know that this service is here for people like myself, who need answers fast and are not sure who to consult. GP Hesperia, CA
  • I couldn't be more satisfied! This is the site I will always come to when I need a second opinion. Justin Kernersville, NC
  • Just let me say that this encounter has been entirely professional and most helpful. I liked that I could ask additional questions and get answered in a very short turn around. Esther Woodstock, NY
  • Thank you so much for taking your time and knowledge to support my concerns. Not only did you answer my questions, you even took it a step further with replying with more pertinent information I needed to know. Robin Elkton, Maryland
  • He answered my question promptly and gave me accurate, detailed information. If all of your experts are half as good, you have a great thing going here. Diane Dallas, TX
 
 
 

Fallopian Tube Problems

Many women face fallopian tube problems and need surgical assistance to correct them. These problems could range from ruptures and cysts to fallopian tube pregnancies. However, several women with fallopian tube problems may not be aware of the treatments that are available. To learn more about fallopian tube problems, take a look at the questions below that have been answered by the Experts.

What impact does a “slightly dilated” fallopian tube have on the ability to conceive?

In many cases, if one fallopian tube is clear and the other is blocked, a woman's chances of becoming pregnant may lowered by half. When a fallopian tube becomes dilated, it is often caused by an obstruction in the end of the tube, located far away from the uterus. Because there is an obstruction, fluid usually builds up in the tube causing the tube to dilate. This is known as hydrosalpinx and could be caused by an infection. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) is a common cause of hydrosalpinx which will cause inflammation of the fallopian tubes. In some cases, fluid may sometimes remain in the fallopian tubes after the PID has been healed. If the blockage can be removed, the woman's chances of becoming pregnant will increase.

Can a 46 year old women become pregnant with a blocked fallopian tube?

Case details: Stopped taking oral contraceptives after missing a period.

Generally, only one fallopian tube is needed to ensure the sperm can reach the ovum. Therefore, while the ability to conceive is smaller with only one fallopian tube open, it is still very possible.

If a woman was taking oral contraceptives before a missed period, usually, the chances of pregnancy are small. Furthermore, a woman at the age of 46 usually has a low chance of becoming pregnant. Having said that, the only way to be sure would be to have a blood pregnancy test two weeks after the missed period.

How does someone know if their fallopian tubes are blocked? Is pain in the side a symptom?

Generally, the only way to determine if a woman has a blocked fallopian tube is by doing a hysterosalpingography. This procedure involves placing a contrast into the uterine cavity and viewing its passage from the tubes with the help of an x-ray. If there is a fallopian tube blockage, the x-ray will pick it up.

As for pain experienced in the side, this wouldn’t necessarily indicate a blocked fallopian tube. Other issues such as cysts, tubal pregnancies or Pelvic Inflammatory Disease could be the cause of this as well. However, if the woman has a problem trying to conceive, she should visit her gynecologist and examine the possibility of blocked fallopian tubes.

Can an MRI detect a blocked fallopian tube?

Usually, an MRI is a great tool when locating growths and tumors. An MRI can also determine if something is being compressed. However, an MRI cannot determine if a fallopian tube is blocked. In order to check for a blockage in a fallopian tube, a hysterosalpingogram or a chromotubation test is usually performed.

If there is no right fallopian tube, can a woman still get pregnant if she is ovulating on the left?

In most cases, a woman can become pregnant with only one fallopian tube. If the woman is ovulating on the left, the woman's egg will travel down the left tube and meet the sperm. Since it only requires one sperm out of millions to reach the egg, pregnancy is still a possibility.

While many women face fallopian tube issues, women of child bearing age are often concerned about becoming pregnant when they know they have fallopian tube problems. In this situation, it is important to fully understand the implications of the condition. If you have any questions regarding fallopian tube problems, ask an Expert for medical insights and suggestions for proper treatment based on the facts of your case.

Ask an OB GYN Doctor

Dr. C.
Dr. C., Board Certified
Category: General
Satisfied Customers: 1639
Experience:  29 years of experience and an award-winning educator.
54412793
Type Your OB GYN Question Here...
characters left:
3 OB GYN Doctors are Online Now

How JustAnswer Works:

  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.

OB GYN Doctors are online & ready to help you now

Ron
ASE Certified Technician
Satisfied Customers: 21579
23 years with Ford specializing in drivability and electrical and AC. Ford certs and ASE Certs
Dr. Y.
Urologist
Satisfied Customers: 18592
I am fellowship trained specializing in general urology and reconstructive urology.
John
Home Appliance Technician
Satisfied Customers: 13453
Appliance repair business owner for over 43 years.

Recent Fallopian Tube Questions

  • Hi, I am hoping someone can provide me with a much needed

    Hi,
    I am hoping someone can provide me with a much needed second opinion.
    Exactly two months ago, on 2nd of June, I had two 5-day blastocysts transferred after ICSI. Prior to starting the IVF cycle I had a hysteroscopy which showed a normal uterine cavity, except for a few small fibroids which were not considered to be an impediment to pregnancy. Blood work all clear. In good overall health. I am 42 years old.
    Beta-hCGs and timeline following ICSI:
    13 June: hCG 164
    17 June: hCG 112
    20 June: hCG 127 (ceased progesterone pessaries, as miscarriage indicated)
    24 June: Menstruation begins
    26 June: hCG 97
    8 July : hCG 479 (u/s requested as hCG should have returned to baseline. Small I/U sac seen. Tubes clear. Inconclusive. Incomplete miscarriage possible and wait and see approach advised)
    11 July: hCG 753
    14 July: hCG 1300, progesterone 14 (ultrasound shows interuterine gestational and yolk sac. Gestational sac measures 5w2d. Still uncertain, but some suggestion I fell pregnant naturally immediately following miscarriage of ICSI embryos. Sonographer notes extrauterine fibroid that appears to be hanging near right ovary. Right ovary tucked behind tilted uterus and difficult to see. Begin 400mg Progesterone pessaries to support pregnancy)
    18 July: hCG 2006
    22 July: hCG 3027, progesterone 67
    23 July: U/s indicates gestational sac only minimally grown. Tubes and ovaries appear normal however tilted uterus makes ultrasound images less clear. Extrauterine suspected fibroid looked at again. Fibroid shows evidence of blood flow which may indicate a cyst. Question raised as to whether the suspected fibroid could be ectopic. Heterotopic pregnancy queried.
    I have been advised by the supervising doctor that, although the case is unusual, there can be no doubt that the pregnancy is not viable. I have had no symptoms of bleeding or pain, although I do still feel pregnant. Doctor advises that, although heterotopic pregnancies are rare, it would be advisable to perform a D&C to evacuate uterine contents and laparoscopy to get a better view of the fibroid and tubes.
    My concern is that the diagnosis is unclear and I have no symptoms which might indicate ectopic pregnancy. I feel incredibly wary of surgery but am unwilling to question medical advice even though they cannot give a definitive diagnosis. Have been advised that the question of whether or not to remove my fallopian tube during laparoscopy will be at the surgeon's discretion. I am terribly worried about this. Terrified, actually.
    Given that I have no symptoms of pain or bleeding, why can't I take the course of expectant management? I have ceased the pessaries 3 days ago and surely the miscarriage can be allowed to occur naturally. Why is the D&C necessary? And should I bother with a laparoscopy given that all 3 ultrasounds showed no evidence of tubal pregnancy? The only problem is the extrauterine fibroid which may have changed only slightly and surely poses no risks and cannot be excised during laparoscopy anyway?
    I am terribly confused and utterly petrified and I dare not go to another doctor and ask for a second opinion as they will have to ask the Clinic for my records. I do not wish to anger my supervising doctor, or the clinic, as I still have 2 frozen embryos with them. I am worried that asking for another opinion will compromise my future treatment.
    Surgery is scheduled in 2 days and I am really hesitant to go ahead with it. Do I have reasonable grounds for refusing surgery in the nicest way possible and just allowing everything to resolve naturally?
    Hoping you can offer some insight or advice!
  • I have a mucus filled appendix per a ct scan. The doctor wants

    I have a mucus filled appendix per a ct scan. The doctor wants to take it out and it is close to my ovary and fallopian tube. If it is attached, they will take those also. I am 62 and don't need them anyway. Have never been on HRT. What are the odds this could be cancer?
  • I have had my removed in 1996. The ovaries and fallopian

    I have had my uterus removed in 1996. The ovaries and fallopian tubes were left. Today when I had a pelvic ultrasound I was told that I had fluid in my right fallopian tube. What does that mean? I have been in menopause for about 14 years.
< Last | Next >
View More OB GYN Questions