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Robin D.
Robin D., Senior Tax Advisor 4
Category: Tax
Satisfied Customers: 13323
Experience:  15years with H & R Block. Divisional leader, Instructor
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I need to know who I can claim as a dependent. I am single

Customer Question

I need to know who I can claim as a dependent. I am single (divorced) and my 34 yr-old daughter and her 16 yr-old daughter both live with me full-time. I support both of them. My gross income is about $80,000 per year. My daughter makes about $5000. She pays for far less than half of her own support, and almost none of her daughters. She wants to claim both herself and her daughter as dependents. I want the same.
How do we resolve this?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Tax
Expert:  Robin D. replied 1 year ago.

Hello

Because your daughter is over 24 and makes more than the personal exemption amount ($4000 for 2015), you cannot claim her as a dependent.

Your granddaughter is generally going to be the dependent of the person that provides more for her support. BUT, because she also lives with her mother, if your daughter claims your grandchild, the IRS will decide for your daughter and not you.

Because your daughter made more than $4,000, she doesn’t qualify as your dependent, but the grandchild would because they can be qualifying child for both you and your daughter. If your daughter agreed to let you claim the child as your dependent, and because her Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) is less than yours then you could claim them.

If she insists on claiming her child and you claimed them too, the IRS would apply the tie breaker rules. Those favor the person with the higher Adjusted Gross Income. You should pint out to your daughter that you make far more and could show the IRS that you do provide more for them than she can at her amount of income.

Expert:  Robin D. replied 1 year ago.

Because your daughter made more than $4,000, she doesn’t qualify as your dependent, but the grandchild would because they can be qualifying child for both you and your daughter. If your daughter agreed to let you claim the child as your dependent, and because her Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) is less than yours then you could claim the grandchild.

I had to clarify that, you can claim the child but not your daughter

Expert:  Robin D. replied 1 year ago.

You cannot split the child and your daughter needs to see that in reality she is just not really financially supporting her daughter yet.

If my answer addressed your question please rate below or above (let me know if you have difficulty as I believe the system changed), if you need more information reply below.

Expert:  Robin D. replied 1 year ago.

Please advise if you need more information or rating in a positive way is acceptable.

Expert:  Robin D. replied 1 year ago.

What other information do you require?

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