How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Robin D. Your Own Question
Robin D.
Robin D., Senior Tax Advisor 4
Category: Tax
Satisfied Customers: 13327
Experience:  15years with H & R Block. Divisional leader, Instructor
14155347
Type Your Tax Question Here...
Robin D. is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

Daughter, Age 23, Worked in 2014 and earned 14894.00 was not

Customer Question

Daughter, Age 23, Worked in 2014 and earned 14894.00 was not a student at all in 2014. The daughter had major medical issues that cost her mom and dad over 36K, plus they had to provide the insurance coverage. The daughter has filed and received a refund. Can I have her amend her return and NOT claim herself and I take her exemption and also her medical expenses that I had to pay. I had to take out a retirement to pay this expense as it had to be paid for the medical condition.
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Tax
Expert:  Robin D. replied 1 year ago.

Hello,
As the daughter was not a student she would not fall under Qualifying Child (where income is not limited) but Qualifying Relative dependent rules. Her income unfortunately was too high to be claimed as a relative.

You can claim the medical expenses on your Schedule A though. There is generally a rule that says you can only use dependent expenses but an exception applies that says if the only reason is the income of the person that prevents you claiming them, you can still claim medical you paid on your Schedule A for that person.

You cannot request she not claim herself but you can claim the medical anyway.

Expert:  Robin D. replied 1 year ago.

If my answer addressed your question please rate below or above (let me know if you have difficulty as I believe the system changed), if you need more information reply below.

Expert:  Robin D. replied 1 year ago.

I was happy to be able to give you that good news about the medical expense deduction.

Please advise if you need more information or rating in a positive way is acceptable.

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Robin
Finally got back to you. I do NOT know what the issue was with the Just Answer process but it appeared as if another was using my CC and they locked me down, finally got them to go to Admin and see where the issue was and there was not issue American Express proved to me it was not on my side but finally got through!! That is the main thing...I need more as to maybe IRS Text or some proof that they can use this as a deduction. Can you maybe provide a little more as this is no more at this time that they can use. I have called the taxpayer but they are not satisfied at this time.
Expert:  Robin D. replied 1 year ago.

So sorry you experienced a problem with the site.

We already know and can show that the daughter is not a qualifying child because of age and she is not a student.

That leaves relative. Her income knocks her out of being claimed as a qualifying relative. If you show them the IRS publication 502 (easier to read than IRC) section that reads:
"You can include medical expenses you paid for an individual that would have been your dependent except that:

1. He or she received gross income of $3,950 or more in 2014,

2. He or she filed a joint return for 2014, or

3. You, or your spouse if filing jointly, could be claimed as a dependent on someone else's 2014 return

If the customer is not satisfied with claiming the medical and still wishes to claim the daughter as a dependent then you would have to walk them through the tests for dependency.

A qualifying child is a child who:

1. Is your son, daughter, stepchild, foster child, brother, sister, stepbrother, stepsister, half brother, half sister, or a descendant of any of them (for example, your grandchild, niece, or nephew),

2. Was:

a. Under age 19 at the end of 2014 and younger than you (or your spouse, if filing jointly),

b. Under age 24 at the end of 2014, a full-time student, and younger than you (or your spouse, if filing jointly),

or c. Any age and permanently and totally disabled,

3. Lived with you for more than half of 2014,

4. Did not provide over half of his or her own support for 2014, and

5. Did not file a joint return, other than to claim a refund

Their daughter clearly is not meeting the test because of her age and not being a fulltime student.

Expert:  Robin D. replied 1 year ago.

If my answer addressed your question please rate below or above (let me know if you have difficulty as I believe the system changed), if you need more information reply below.

Rating lets Just Answer know you were assisted and credits me for my time.

Related Tax Questions