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Tax.appeal.168
Tax.appeal.168, Tax Accountant
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What happens when two people own property and only one has

Customer Question

what happens when two people own property and only one has paid all the taxes and upkeep for over 10 years and the other owner has not put any money out of pocket?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Tax
Expert:  Tax.appeal.168 replied 1 year ago.
Welcome. Thank you for choosing us to assist you. My name is ***** ***** my goal is to help make your life, a little... less taxing.
If both parties are legal and equitable owners of the property, whether one or both parties have paid the taxes and upkeep, both parties are legally responsible for the property. If the one party that has paid the taxes and upkeep wants to claim the real estate taxes paid on his/her return, they have the legal right to claim up to the percentage of taxes that they paid. If that is 100%, he/she can claim 100%. As for the other person who is paying nothing, basically they are just an owner. If they have not paid any of the taxes, they are technically should not claim any of the real estate taxes paid, as they did not pay any of the taxes. You didn't mention mortgage interest. I am assuming that there is no mortgage on the property.
Have you considered asking the other person to quit deed over the portion of the property that they own to you?
Let me know if you require further assistance with this matter.

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