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Lane
Lane, JD, CFP, MBA, CRPS
Category: Tax
Satisfied Customers: 10481
Experience:  Law Degree, specialization in Tax Law and Corporate Law, CFP and MBA, Providing Financial & Tax advice since 1986
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When receiving a compensation bonus from my employer, what

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When receiving a compensation bonus from my employer, what is my best taxation strategy?

NPVAdvisor :

Hi,

Customer:

Hi

NPVAdvisor :

SO MUCH of that answer has to do with your specific situation .... The bonus. is really just additional income for the year... So the possible answers are the same answers that MIGHT already be there for reducing taxes, generally (1) increase contributions to your qualified retirement plan for the rest of the year ...

NPVAdvisor :

(2) Be sureyou've maximized form 2106 (unreimbursed employee expenses)

NPVAdvisor :

(3) Look for every possible deduction (if you itemize) Here's one of the most exaustive lists I've seen:

NPVAdvisor :

Be sure you're not missing any dependency exemptions (children and others that may be claimed as dependents)

NPVAdvisor :

File jointly if possible

NPVAdvisor :

Probably the biggest difference you can make (since we still have4 mon ths left in the year is to increase 401(k) contributions for the retst of the year ... the additional income will raise the amount you can contributew AND this monsy stays your (as opposed to all of the other deeductions you can take where you have to spend a dollar to save 25 cwnts (at the 15% tax bracket)

NPVAdvisor :

(sorry for they typos) the money is still your money, (in that retirement plan), again, as opposed to actually SPENDING the money on something to get a deduction

NPVAdvisor :

If you've ever thought about starting a business ... now ight be the time, (as it's common to have more expenses than income in the first year) thereby generating a tax loss

NPVAdvisor :

(If you do that for 3 years or so the IRS may come back and call it a hobby, but if you really have those aspirations to start that business, now may be the time (both because of the additional money in pocket and the potential first year tax losses)

Customer:

Is it better to stretch out the payments to lessen the tax rate?

NPVAdvisor :

YEs, if you can control that... ABSOLUTELY

NPVAdvisor :

Do you file jintly or single (I can get tha rate tables for you so you can see when you are about to go into that next bracket for the year)

NPVAdvisor :

VERY good thought

Customer:

jointly

NPVAdvisor :


  • 10% on taxable income from $0 to $17,850, plus

  • 15% on taxable income over $17,850 to $72,500, plus

  • 25% on taxable income over $72,500 to $146,400, plus

  • 28% on taxable income over $146,400 to $223,050, plus

  • 33% on taxable income over $223,050 to $398,350, plus

  • 35% on taxable income over $398,350 to $450,000, plus

  • 39.6% on taxable income over $450,000.

Customer:

39.6 ouch

NPVAdvisor :

Yep, but remember that's a progressive rate ... but yes 39.6 on that last dollar, if that's where you are ... AND remember that's TAXABLE income (after itemized deductions or standard and exemptions

Customer:

Thank you

NPVAdvisor :

Nice year!

Lane and other Tax Specialists are ready to help you