How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Robin D. Your Own Question
Robin D.
Robin D., Senior Tax Advisor 4
Category: Tax
Satisfied Customers: 13635
Experience:  15years with H & R Block. Divisional leader, Instructor
14155347
Type Your Tax Question Here...
Robin D. is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

My husband and I have had two households for work reasons (jobs

This answer was rated:

My husband and I have had two households for work reasons (jobs in different cities). A coworker told me that she was able to deduct the extra household expenses for this reason. And thinks maybe even the travel to visit each would count. Is this true? I can only find the opportunity to deduct if you work at home.

Robin D. :

Hello and thank you for using Just Answer,
Taxpayers generally can deduct expenses if they are working on a temporary basis away from their regular tax home.

Robin D. :

Your tax home is where you earn your income not actually where you live even.

Robin D. :

So if you live in one city but work in another you are not allowed to claim any expenses.

Robin D. :

That would be commuting expense and not allowed to be deducted, unfortunately.

Customer:

Okay- so in my situation, I get paid in the city where I am paying the double rent, and this is not deductible?

Robin D. :

If that city is your main place of business then unless you are required to travel to other areas you would not be allowed to claim.v

Customer:

It would only be if my job had me located at another location temporarily while still being paid at the first location?

Robin D. :

Here is a good example the IRS uses
Generally, your tax home is the entire city or general area where your main place of business or work is located, regardless of where you maintain your family home. For example, you live with your family in Chicago but work in Milwaukee where you stay in a hotel and eat in restaurants. You return to Chicago every weekend. You may not deduct any of your travel, meals, or lodging in Milwaukee because that is your tax home. Your travel on weekends to your family home in Chicago is not for your work, so these expenses are also not deductible. If you regularly work in more than one place, your tax home is the general area where your main place of business or work is located.

Robin D. :

Travel expenses paid or incurred in connection with a temporary work assignment away from home are deductible. However, travel expenses paid in connection with an indefinite work assignment are not deductible. Any work assignment in excess of one year is considered indefinite.

Customer:

Sounds like my coworker shouldn't have been deducting either (extra home closer to work).

Robin D. :

Many people get mixed up about what they can and cannot deduct

Customer:

They have an accountant.

Customer:

But thanks for clarifying—it seemed too good to be true.

Robin D. :

I can give you the IRS page url if you would like

Robin D. :

It explains travel and expenses pretty easily.

Robin D. :

I really enjoyed working with you – please feel free to request me again when you come back to ask another question.

Customer:

Thanks.

Robin D. :

Thank you

Customer:

Will do.

Robin D. and 4 other Tax Specialists are ready to help you

Related Tax Questions