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Robin D.
Robin D., Senior Tax Advisor 4
Category: Tax
Satisfied Customers: 13626
Experience:  15years with H & R Block. Divisional leader, Instructor
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Tax

Is Social Security considered gross income? My husband is

Is Social Security considered gross... Show More
Is Social Security considered gross income? My husband is 100% disabled and receives Veteran's benefits. He also receives some Social Security. Can I file seperately and claim him as an exemption?
I read that I can file seperate and claim an exemption for my spouse only if we meet the following:
Your spouse has no gross income. (is his Social Security considered income?)
Your spouse is not filing a return.
Your spouse was not another taxpayer's depende.
Submitted: 4 years ago.
Category: Tax
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replied 4 years ago.

Robin D :

Hello and thank you for using Just Answer

Robin D :

The social security would be concidered as gross income and your spouse would need to file a tax return if half of the Social Security was over the $3700. It is possible that some of his SS would be taxable to him as well because Married Filing Sep has a base amount of $0.

Robin D :

I sincerely XXXXX XXXXX information is helpful and thank you in advance for clicking ACCEPT.

Robin D :

Did you have another question on this subject

Customer:

So if I file married filing separately, my husband would not need to file at all if half of his Social Security is under $3,700. Correct?

Robin D :

The $3700 is the requirement to need to file a return if Married Filing Sep. The gross income would be all his SS because of the married filing sep. The portion of his SS that would be taxable could be up to 85% because you two lived together and file separate.

Robin D :

Anytime you file a separate return the normal deductions and limitations are changed.

Robin D :

Unless you are required to file separately, you should figure your tax both ways (on a joint return and on separate returns). This way you can make sure you are using the filing status that results in the lowest combined tax.

Robin D :

Your preparer is correct, you would not be allowed to claim your spouse as a dependent.

Customer:

But if I f

Customer:

But just to make sure:I file will married filing separately and not claim my spouse. My spouse also needs to file

Robin D :

Correct

Robin D :

I thank you again and please know that you can always come back even after you click accept.

Customer:

As a 100% disabled veteran, he does not need to claim his Veteran's benefits but he does need to claim Social Security? Correct?

Robin D :

That is correct. None of his VA is applied for any reason

Customer:

Thanks

Robin D :

You are welcome

Customer reply replied 4 years ago.
Is there a minimum amount of Social Security Income where you do not need to file?
Robin D., Senior Tax Advisor 4 replied 4 years ago.

Hello again,

If you are not filing MFS and the SS is the only income you have then you are not required to file. If you are filing MFS and you have more than $3700 then you are required to file a return.

The requirements are all tied to Filing Status (some include age) and amount received.

Customer reply replied 4 years ago.
So I will file married filing single. My spouse will not need to file since his SS is less than $3700. Okay?
Robin D., Senior Tax Advisor 4 replied 4 years ago.
If his SS is less than $3700 and that is all he received from all sources, he would not be required to file.