How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Lev Your Own Question
Lev
Lev, Tax Advisor
Category: Tax
Satisfied Customers: 28856
Experience:  Taxes, Immigration, Labor Relations
870116
Type Your Tax Question Here...
Lev is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

Ive removed money from and IRA for the purpose of purchasing

Resolved Question:

I've removed money from and IRA for the purpose of purchasing a house. I plan to take advantage of the exception to the 10% penalty rule that is allowed for purchasing the house. I understand that I will have to pay tax on the amount. I requested the amount without any withholding. So, how can I best prepare for this? Shall I send money to the IRS now, or wait until tax time? Where on the tax forms do take the exception?

Thanks!
Submitted: 5 years ago.
Category: Tax
Expert:  Lev replied 5 years ago.

Hi and welcome to Just Answer!

So, how can I best prepare for this?

First of all - you need to estimate your overal tax liability.

Then you need to estimate the tax amount paid via withholding from your paychecks and other payments - so you will know estimated amount you should pay.

Be sure that you have that amount to avoid late payments.

Shall I send money to the IRS now, or wait until tax time?

If you did not pay enough tax throughout the year, either through withholding or by making estimated tax payments, you may have to pay a penalty for underpayment of estimated tax. Generally, most taxpayers will avoid this penalty if they owe less than $1,000 in tax after subtracting their withholdings and credits, or if they paid at least 90% of the tax for the current year, or 100% of the tax shown on the return for the prior year, whichever is smaller.

 

When figuring your estimated tax for the current year, it may be helpful to use your income, deductions, and credits for prior year as a starting point. Use your prior year's federal tax return as a guide. You can use the worksheet in Form 1040-ES - http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f1040es.pdf to figure your estimated tax. You will need to estimate the amount of income you expect to earn for the year. If you estimated your earnings too high, simply complete another Form 1040-ES worksheet to refigure your estimated tax for the next quarter. If you estimated your earnings too low, again complete another Form 1040-ES worksheet to recalculate your estimated tax for the next quarter. You want to estimate your income as accurately as you can to avoid penalties.

Where on the tax forms do take the exception?
You should file Form 5329, Additional Taxes on Qualified Plans (Including IRA's) and other Tax-Favored Accounts - http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f5329.pdf - to claim an exemption.

You will use exemption code on line 2 - use code "09" for IRA distributions made for purchase of a first home, up to $10,000 - see page 3 in instructions - http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/i5329.pdf

 

Let me know if you need any help.

Lev and 5 other Tax Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 5 years ago.
This is very helpful and all that I need right now. Thank you!
Expert:  Lev replied 5 years ago.

Please be sure to accept the answer. Experts are credited only if answers are accepted.

Let me know if you need any help.