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MequonCPA
MequonCPA, Certified Public Accountant (CPA)
Category: Tax
Satisfied Customers: 2342
Experience:  CPA, Over 30 yrs experience w/individuals and small businesses. Masters in Tax.
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Hi ... how long can I claim my son on my taxes. He is no longer

Resolved Question:

Hi ... how long can I claim my son on my taxes. He is no longer a student, but I do pay for more that 3/4ths of his living expenses. He does not live under my roof... I pay his appartment and utilities.
Submitted: 8 years ago.
Category: Tax
Expert:  MequonCPA replied 8 years ago.

DearCustomer-

 

If your son was a student for at least 5 months in 2008, you could possibly still claim him as a dependent.

 

If he was not a student, as you do not provide more than 1/2 of his support, you cannot claim him as a dependent.

 

I have provided a link to IRS Publication 501, which fully explains who qualifies as a dependent. http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p501.pdf

MequonCPA and other Tax Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 8 years ago.

Hi...

Your answer states that I do not provide more thatn 1/2 of his support. I do. My note to you stated that I provide at least 3/4 of his support. I pay for his appartment and all of his utilities.

 

Did I miss something??

 

Also does it matter if his appratment is not in MASS?

 

Thanks, Francesca

Expert:  MequonCPA replied 8 years ago.

Dear XXXXXca -

 

I misread it that HE provides 3/4 of the support.

 

For you to get the dependency exemption, he would have to have income of less than $3,400, even if you provide more than 1/2 of his support.

Customer: replied 8 years ago.

Last question. Does it matter that he does not live in the same state that I do.

 

Thanks, Francesca

Expert:  MequonCPA replied 8 years ago.

Francesca -

 

Because he is your son, his state of residence does not matter.

 

If you may be allowed to claim him, both of you should review the cost/benefit for each of you changing who claims him (you or him).