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Cassandra, Tax Preparer
Category: Tax
Satisfied Customers: 306
Experience:  8yrs experience in taxation for individuals. CTEC Registered and an Authorized E-filer with the IRS
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Hi, Can you tell me if Union Dues are paid with

Customer Question

Can you tell me if Union Dues are paid with pre-tax dollars or after-tax dollars?
Submitted: 8 years ago.
Category: Tax
Expert:  Cassandra replied 8 years ago.
HelloCustomerand welcome to just answer.

Generally speaking union dues are after tax-dollars, however I have seen certain union dues that are paid with pre-tax dollars.

Now, if you pay your union dues with after tax-dollars, then you can deduct them on a schedule A as a Misc. deduction on line 21, subject to 2% of your AGI. This is only if a schedule A will give you more deduction than your standard deduction.
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Customer: replied 8 years ago.
Reply to Cassandra's Post: Just to make sure I understand, if I join a union that charges 6% of my pay, then I will only be able to get 4% of that back (6% - 2% agi)
Expert:  Cassandra replied 8 years ago.
I will include a copy of a schedule A for you to view at the end of this message. The 2% is based on your AGI, and is included of all things that are in the Misc. category of a schedule A. Schedule A includes unreimbursed job expenses and travel, union dues, tax preparation fees and investment safety box.

For example you come up with $2000 in misc expenses in total. Your AGI is $50,000 then 2% of 50,000 is $1000. So the first $1000 of the $2000 is not deductible. In this scenario you would be able to deduct only $1000.

Of course all of this is dependent on the fact that it is better for you to file a schedule A, versus using your standard deduction.

Does that make sense, and if not, let me know how I can explain it better to you or where you are confused.