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Marvin,EA
Marvin,EA, Enrolled Agent
Category: Tax
Satisfied Customers: 1672
Experience:  Enrolled to Represent Taxpayers Before The IRS
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I lost over 100 pounds and was left with severely hanging ...

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I lost over 100 pounds and was left with severely hanging skin, which was disfiguring (and I have the "before" photos to support that). I spent $20,800 on cosmetic surgery to remove the loose skin. Can I deduct the cost of this cosmetic surgery?

Thank you for using Just Answer. From IRS Publication 502, Medical and Dental Expenses, page 15 Cosmetic Surgery - Generally, you cannot include in medical expenses the amount you pay for unnecessary cosmetic surgery. This includes any procedure that is directed at improving the patient's appearance and does not meaningfully promote the proper function of the body or prevent or treat illness or disease. You generally cannot include in medical expenses the amount you pay for procedures such as face lifts, hair transplants, hair removal, and liposuction.

You can include in medical expenses the amount you pay for cosmetic surgery if it is necessary to improve a deformity arising from, or directly related to, a congenital abnormality, a personal injury resulting from an accident or trauma, or a disfiguring disease.

I do not believe you can deduct the amount for medical expenses.

Customer: replied 8 years ago.
Reply to Marvin,EA's Post: Thank you, XXXXX XXXXX already had IRS publication 502 with the information you provided. I also knew that publication 502 states:
"You can include in medical expenses the amount you pay for cosmetic surgery if it is necessary to improve a deformity arising from, or directly related to, a congenital abnormality, a personal injury resulting from an accident or trauma, or a disfiguring disease."

My question was about the nuance of exactly what constitutes disfigurement, as obviously I felt my extra skin after weight loss was disfiguring (and under some insurance plans is considered a "deformity").
If you have a statement from your doctor stating congenital abnormality for your condition. I would keep the statement with your tax records for 3 years in case of an audit.
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