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jazzmaster
jazzmaster, ASE Certified Technician
Category: Subaru
Satisfied Customers: 2951
Experience:  ASE CERTIFIED 32 YRS EXPERIENCE
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1991 Subaru Legacy: Emissions..I look under the hood..intake manifold

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I am getting the following code on my 1991 Subaru Legacy (non-turbo) 2.2L: 35 -- purge control solenoid valve... When I look at the diagrams in Chilton's and Haines of the Evaporative Emissions control system I see where the Purge Control Solemoid Valve is. But when I look under the hood and try tracing the lines from the charcoal cannister, I lose track just under the intake manifold and cannot find the Purge Control Solenoid Valve. Need help locating it so I can R&R it.

The problem is, when weather is especially cold, the engine surges up and and down and then stalls when first started. If I take my foot off the accelerator, it stalls. Usually this stops happening after the engine warms up to full operating temp (though I still get the surging at idle, just not the stalling). I have a parts car available and would like to swap the purge control solenoid valve and see if that resolves the issue. But need help locating it. How to find it, how to remove it.
hi ,the purge vale is actually the soleniod ,there are 2 wires going to it ,I will usually check the valve with a ground wire and a hot wire ,attach the ground wire to one of the terminals on the soleniod and then touch the other terminal with the hot ,it should click,do it a few times to make sure also
  • Disconnect and orally blow air through the vacuum hose; there should be no leaks.
  • Disconnect and orally blow air through the purge hose; there should be no leaks.
  • Disconnect the tank vapor hose from the fuel tank side. Orally blow air through the hose and check for unobstructed flow.
  • Visually check the canister exterior for cracks or other damage; replace if problems are detected this can cause the problems you are having if itis indeed stuck open,you will have to remove the intake manifold to get to this ,also it could just be a cracked or broken vacuum hose that is causing the surging and stalling so look closely at the vacuum hoses under the intake and to the throttle body here is a diagram of where it is and it shows you what it looks like ,graphic
  • Customer: replied 6 years ago.
    Thank you, XXXXX XXXXX helps.

    So, do I understand that to access the solenoid, I need to remove the intake manifold?

    And I'm not understanding about how to do the two "blow" tests. Do I disconnect the hoses at the charcoal cannister and blow through them?

    If so, what should happen when I blow? Should I feel resistance? Should I feel a free flow? How would I know, from blowing, if there is a leak?

    I did visually inspect the cannister and hoses today, but obviously, could not see what was going on under the manifold. Sounds like I may need to pull that.

    Also, I did not carefully follow all the other vacuum hoses and check them for cracks, only the lines connected to the cannister. Do I need to check ALL vacuum hoses?

    Thanks,
    kwc
    Customer: replied 6 years ago.
    Thank you, XXXXX XXXXX helps.

    So, do I understand that to access the solenoid, I need to remove the intake manifold?

    And I'm not understanding about how to do the two "blow" tests. Do I disconnect the hoses at the charcoal cannister and blow through them?

    If so, what should happen when I blow? Should I feel resistance? Should I feel a free flow? How would I know, from blowing, if there is a leak?

    I did visually inspect the cannister and hoses today, but obviously, could not see what was going on under the manifold. Sounds like I may need to pull that.

    Also, I did not carefully follow all the other vacuum hoses and check them for cracks, only the lines connected to the cannister. Do I need to check ALL vacuum hoses?

    Also, to test the solenoid itself as you described, do you remove the intake manifold? Or are you able to reach it with probes?

    Thanks,
    kwc
    it may be possible to reach with probes look behind the intake and see if you can acess the solenoid there ,you might have to take a few things out of the way, .but I would definately look for bad vacuum hoses first that seems to be the problem,but if you do have to remove the solenoid you have to blow through the fittings right on the valve and it should be closed and you should not be able to blow air through either side that the hoses go to ,also it might be possible to not have to remove the intake with the right swivels and extensions, you will just have to look and see ,and yes check all the vacuum lines and hoses ,I am pretty sure you will find a bad or cracked hose and that would make your life easier lol I know it does mine when I can take a few shortcuts to get a job done ,let me know what you find please ...guy...
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