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lev-tax
lev-tax, Tax Advisor
Category: Social Security
Satisfied Customers: 28947
Experience:  Taxes, Immigration, Labor Relations
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GOSH!! My price went up in the 2 minutes it took me to add

Customer Question

GOSH!! My price went up in the 2 minutes it took me to add some info!!
That doesn't seem fair.
As a "first" wife that has never remarried I was told that I could draw off my EX's SS but never told WHEN??
I am on SSD and could really use the help.
It has come to my attention that my EX is also on SSD and has been for quite some time. Where does that leave me?
I am 59 yrs old and he is 61 and remarried.
Owning our on business together for 20 yrs he NEVER cut me a check, so never paid any FICA, and gave him a free employee, which gives me ZERO security in my 60's.
I have been waiting a LONG time to be able to draw as a 1st wife.
I haven't a dollar to waste so please only charge me if its info I can actually use right now.
Thank You
Rachel P
Submitted: 9 months ago.
Category: Social Security
Expert:  lev-tax replied 9 months ago.

As a "first" wife that has never remarried I was told that I could draw off my EX's SS but never told WHEN??

As a divorce spouse - you are eligible for social security benefits based on your ex-spouse's earning record if you were married at least ten years - and if

if:

  • You are unmarried;
  • You are age 62 or older;
  • Your ex-spouse is entitled to Social Security retirement or disability benefits and
  • The benefit you are entitled to receive based on your own work is less than the benefit you would receive based on your ex-spouse's work.

Your benefit as a divorced spouse is equal to one-half of your ex-spouse's full retirement amount (or disability benefit) if you start receiving benefits at your full retirement age.

Expert:  lev-tax replied 9 months ago.

Your benefit as a divorced spouse is equal to one-half of your ex-spouse's full retirement amount (or disability benefit) if you start receiving benefits at your full retirement age.

If your spouse is 61 - and not disabled - you may not receive spousal benefits based on his working record.

Generally - you may start when he will turn 66 and two months - that is his FRA - full retirement age.

OR - you may start earlier - if your ex-spouse will start his benefits.

Let me know if that answered your question?