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lev-tax, Tax Advisor
Category: Social Security
Satisfied Customers: 28081
Experience:  Taxes, Immigration, Labor Relations
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I am 80 years old. A veteran of Marine Corps 1953 - 1956, with

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I am 80 years old. A veteran of Marine Corps 1953 - 1956, with some hearing loss from howitzer fire. I and ex-wife have a daughter disabled since birth. Are there any benefits I am missing? I now have have had stem cell replacement on one knee. I began taking benefits when I turned 65 in 2001. Have taken a disability retirement from teaching in 2011. I also had a permanent disability related to my back in 1980 for which I received some retraining money but no long term payments.
Submitted: 5 months ago.
Category: Social Security
Expert:  lev-tax replied 5 months ago.
Since 1957, if you had military service earnings for active duty (including active duty for training), you paid Social Security taxes on those earnings. Since 1988, inactive duty service in the Armed Forces reserves (such as weekend drills) has also been covered by Social Security.Under certain circumstances, special extra earnings for your military service from 1957 through 2001 can be credited to your record for Social Security purposes. These extra earnings credits may help you qualify for Social Security or increase the amount of your Social Security benefit.Special extra earnings credits are granted for periods of active duty or active duty for training. Special extra earnings credits are not granted for inactive duty training.
Expert:  lev-tax replied 5 months ago.
If your active military service occurredFrom 1957 through 1967, we will add the extra credits to your record when you apply for Social Security benefits.From 1968 through 2001, you do not need to do anything to receive these extra credits. The credits were automatically added to your record.After 2001, there are no special extra earnings credits for military service.See following publication for additional details. appreciate if you take a moment to rate the answer.Experts are ONLY credited when answers are rated positively.If you still have any doubts, need clarification - please be sure to ask.I am here to help you with all tax related issues.

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