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Stephanie O Joy, Esq
Stephanie O Joy, Esq, Soc. Sec. Attorney
Category: Social Security
Satisfied Customers: 13388
Experience:  19+ years legal exp. - 10+ years owning/operating her own SSD Law practice.
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1 - Can I verify my lifelong record of contributions to the

Customer Question

1 - Can I verify my lifelong record of contributions to the Social Security?
2 - What is the maximum benefit that Social Security pays. if there is such a maximum?
Submitted: 11 months ago.
Category: Social Security
Expert:  Stephanie O Joy, Esq replied 11 months ago.

1. Your contributions would be the taxation rate of each year, times the reported SS taxed income you reported that year (and paid taxes on). If you get your annual SS earnings statement, you can then apply the SS tax rate of that particular year, to that reported income (all years of yours will show up in a long list). This should give you your contributions. (Alternatively, you can visit your local SSA office and request this.)

2. The maximum one get get at 66 is known as a PIA (primary insurance amount) and is currently $2639. But if he waits til age 70 to collect, he can get more than his PIA, and payment can rise to $3576.

https://faq.ssa.gov/link/portal/34011/34019/Article/3735/What-is-the-maximum-Social-Security-retirement-benefit-payable

Expert:  Stephanie O Joy, Esq replied 11 months ago.

I hope this helps! My goal is to provide you with excellent and accurate service – if you feel you have gottenanything less, please reply back, I amhappy to address follow-up questions.

Kindly rate me "excellent"when you are done. I look forward to assisting you in the future, should you have legal questions. Be sure to start future posts with "To ***** Esq., ONLY" if you want me to specifically answer it.

Sincerely, ***** ***** Joy, Esq.

Your online SS legal resource!

Expert:  Stephanie O Joy, Esq replied 11 months ago.

Yes, if your ex is over 62 or dead, you, being over 62, can potentially be eligible for a spousal benefit if it is bigger than your own benefit. For it to be bigger than your own benefit, 50% of his benefit must be bigger than YOUR primary insurance amount which is likely about 1180 or so. That means his PIA needs to be about 2360 for a spousal on his record to be better for you than your own. You get the highest benefit, his or yours. That said, if when you applied at 62, he was not yet 62, you wouldn't have been eligible for a spousal because an ex is not eligible til the worker spouse is at least 62. If, on the other hand, he was 62+ when you applied, the SSA checks to see if spousal is higher and if so, pays it to you.

So bot***** *****ne is that while you have eligibility for a spousal benefit, if it is not bigger than your own, then you must take your own. It sounds like they may have confirmed that your own is higher than your spousal, ergo there is nothing left for you to collect because you are already collecting the higher.

BUT, if he dies, you can get 100% of his benefit, so long as you file for it AFTER you hit your FRA (which you have hit), and you'd pick that if the full 100% exceeds your own benefit.

Expert:  Stephanie O Joy, Esq replied 11 months ago.

I hope this helps! My goal is to provide you with excellent and accurate service – if you feel you have gottenanything less, please reply back, I amhappy to address follow-up questions.

Kindly rate me "excellent"when you are done. I look forward to assisting you in the future, should you have legal questions. Be sure to start future posts with "To ***** Esq., ONLY" if you want me to specifically answer it.

Sincerely, ***** ***** Joy, Esq.

Your online SS legal resource!