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Lane
Lane, JD,CFP, MBA, CRPS
Category: Social Security
Satisfied Customers: 11569
Experience:  Law Degree, specialization in Tax Law and Corporate Law, CFP and MBA, Providing Financial, Social Security & Tax advice since 1986
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I receive S.S.D. benefits, I was wondering if I can apply

Customer Question

I receive S.S.D. benefits, I was wondering if I can apply for S.S.I.
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Social Security
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I receive s.s.d. for a transplant I had in 2012. I can't live on this and I have applied for everything I can think of. Then when I was on a web page that spoke to me, it said try applying for s.s.i. you may qualify for that. So now I want to know if I can apply for the s.s.i. although I receive s.s.d. Please help because my daughter and I are really having a hard time surviving here with the money we have and the expenses I have.
Expert:  Lane replied 1 year ago.

Hi,

...

It IS possible.

...

See this:

..

In some circumstances, you can receive both Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits at the same time. This is commonly referred to as “concurrent benefits”. To receive concurrent benefits, you must be approved for SSDI, but receive low monthly payments through the program.

A low monthly SSDI benefit is caused by several factors:

  • You have worked very little or not at all in the last 10 years
  • You had very little work history at the time you became disabled
  • You became disabled at a young age, before building a significant work history
  • You earned relatively low wages throughout the course of your employment history
Expert:  Lane replied 1 year ago.

The hurdles are tough ...

...

SSI is a needs based system, whee, as you probably know SSDI is based on your earnings record AND the definition of being disabled

Expert:  Lane replied 1 year ago.

All income from “countable sources” is reviewed to determine whether you meet the requirements for the SSI program....

...

Eligibility here is fairly complex. Income (both earned and unearned) is considered when determining financial-need, (AND like medicaid and other needs based programs) financial resources (assets) are looked at as well

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Again this gets really complicated ... but here are some of the items that DON'T count as income:

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/OACT/COLA/incomexcluded.html for SSI purposes

Expert:  Lane replied 1 year ago.

I certainly can't guarantee acceptance or even getting the full amount possible from from SSI but to answer your question, you certainly CAN and should apply just to fund out ... there' NO reason not to

Expert:  Lane replied 1 year ago.

Another Caveat of the syste,...

...

Not everything an individual receives is considered to be income. Generally, if the item received cannot be used as, or to obtain, food or shelter, it will not be considered as income.

...

For example, if someone pays an individual's medical bills, or offers free medical care, or if the individual receives money from a social services agency that is a repayment of an amount he/she previously spent, that value is not considered income to the individual. In addition, some items that are considered to be income are excluded when determining the amount of an individual's benefit.

...

and that takes you back to the link I provided above about what's excluded from countable income

...

Again, I would apply, so as to be exhaustive about all of the possibilities

Expert:  Lane replied 1 year ago.

There are currently three methods available to potential disability applicants:

  • filing for disability online (SSDI only)
  • calling the Social Security office to set up an appointment to apply, and
  • walking into the local Social Security office without an appointment.

To get things started and apply for disability benefits, calling is generally the best option.

...

BUT don't ask questions on the call ... ask for an appointment

...

Whether you call or walk in to an office, you will usually be given an appointment to be interviewed at a later date and time -- SOe, calling ahead to apply will generally be less frustrating.