How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Stephanie O Joy, Esq Your Own Question
Stephanie O Joy, Esq
Stephanie O Joy, Esq, Soc. Sec. Attorney
Category: Social Security
Satisfied Customers: 13443
Experience:  19+ years legal exp. - 10+ years owning/operating her own SSD Law practice.
10805288
Type Your Social Security Question Here...
Stephanie O Joy, Esq is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

I saw an article givern to my brother that stated if you ever

This answer was rated:

I saw an article givern to my brother that stated if you ever served in the U. S Armed Forces, you may be entitled to an extra one hundred dollars a month from SSA. I so a ccopy but have since misplaced it, thanks
Hi, my name is XXXXX XXXXX I thank you for your inquiry. I have been practicing SS law full time for 10+ years and look forward to assisting you.


With regard to your post:

I saw an article givern to my brother that stated if you ever served in the U. S Armed Forces, you may be entitled to an extra one hundred dollars a month from SSA. I so a ccopy but have since misplaced it, thanks

It is not quite like that, but it is true that when a military veteran applies for his or her SS benefits, and provides the information requested at application time regarding dates of service, he will be credited with extra EARNINGs applicable to that time of service. Increased earnings (even though no SS taxes paid) during his/her lifetime, means a higher SS benefit rate later, generally. Thus, when you apply, your benefit may be somewhat HIGHER than what your estimations revealed in your annual social security statements.

The SSA site describes it this way:

"Those who served between 1957 and 2001 receive special credits that augment the earnings used in computing their Social Security benefits. Veterans who served between 1957 and 1977 are credited with $300 in additional earnings for each calendar quarter in which they received active-duty basic pay. Those who served from 1978 to 2001 are credited with an additional $100 in earnings for every $300 in active-duty basic pay, up to a maximum of $1,200 a year. Though they were not covered under Social Security and did not pay Social Security taxes, veterans who served between September 16, 1940 and December 31, 1956, may also be credited with $160 a month in earnings.18 These credits, which were funded by the Department of Defense, were originally enacted because some military compensation, such as the value of food, shelter, and medical care, was not used in determining average earnings for computing Social Security benefits."

I hope this helps! My goal is to provide you with excellent and accurate service – if you feel you have gotten anything less, please reply back, I am happy to address follow-up questions. Kindly rate me "excellent" when you are done. I look forward to assisting you in the future, should you have legal questions.

Sincerely,

Alexia Esq.

Stephanie O Joy, Esq and other Social Security Specialists are ready to help you