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Doug E.
Doug E., Kawasaki Master Technician
Category: Small Engine
Satisfied Customers: 2883
Experience:  Professional mechanic since the late 70's on Kawasaki, Arctic Cat, Jonsered, John Deere and others.
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My 22 hp Kawasaki K series engine in my 445 John Deere riding

Customer Question

My 22 hp Kawasaki K series engine in my 445 John Deere riding mower with 1700 hours makes oil. The anti-freeze is full so it is gas that's getting in the oil. It runs fine but it makes 2 ounces every hour of operation. The john deere dealer replaced the fuel pressure regulator and both injectors with o-rings but it still does it. Stumped, they tell me that it's just wore out and I need a new one. I don't buy that answer. If that were true, it would burn oil, not make it wouldn't it?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Small Engine
Expert:  Jeremy R. replied 1 year ago.
Hi, My name isXXXXX you for letting me try and assist you with your problem.
This has been sitting for a while and I'm not 100% on your mower but you should have a low pressure fuel pump that is fed by the vacuum of the crankcase.
If that fuel pump has a ruptured diaphragm in it the gas can leak down the pulse line that ends up right in the crankcase.
It's not worn out, they just can't figure it out.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Not possible as this is a fuel injected motor with electric fuel pump in tank. I think I have low compression. The fuel system is going to spray the same amount of fuel in there no matter if it can burn it all or not, so the unburt fuel gets washed down in to crankcase maybe?
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
What should the compression be? Do you have access to this information?
Expert:  Jeremy R. replied 1 year ago.
No I don't know. It could be low compression though.
What you do on these is a leakdown test. because if it has an internal compression release a compression test won't do you any good.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Hmmmm. I'm still in the dark I'm afaid. Maybe it has an internal compresion release, maybe not. Maybe a leak down test, maybe a compression test. I know the Kohler singles have a compression release,I have one in my pulling tractor, but I don't know much about these Kawasaki twins. I know you would like to get paid for helping me but I really haven't found an answer as to what to do here. Is there anyway to throw my question back into the ring and hope to find someone who has worked on these engines before? Les
Expert:  Jeremy R. replied 1 year ago.
Yes there is.
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.

Hello,

I need a little more information from you.

Have you verified that it is gas in the oil by pulling the fill cap and smelling it for a gas smell or changing the oil and checking that? If it were coolant in the crankcase your oil would foam white.

Did your dealer take a fuel system pressure reading and inspect the injectors, or did they just replace the parts?

It is very difficult to get gas into the crankcase on a FI system being it would have to pass through the injectors and into the top end first. This will cause poor running and smoke. It will also wash down the cylinder walls causing hard starting and lower compression readings.

Here is what I would check. First, you need to know your pressure readings. You may wish to do this yourself unless the dealer recorded the readings for you. The gas not injected into the motor is returned to the tank. Verify the line is clear by removing it from the rail and opening the gas cap. Supply low air pressure to verify the line is open to the tank. Next, open up the air filter housing. There is a curved hose in the top. This is the crankcase vent. Make sure this hose isn't damaged or missing. It may be possible for the crankcase vent to draw some of the air/fuel mixture back into the crankcase if there is a problem there.

Your compression readings should be a minimum of 170psi. That is with the spark plugs removed and engine cranking at 250rpm. Oil pressure should be 40psi while running.

Check those things and let me know what you find. Any additional information or issues you have noticed would be helpful.

Doug

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Ok Doug I will check all of the things you have mentioned and get back to you. Please don't force me to be in a hurry as it may be this weekend before I have time. I do have some engine repair skills as I was a Ford tech back in the 80's and do have some tools and equipment. I will have to look at the Kawasaki engine to see if any of my tools are compatable and able to take some readings. I will be in touch. Les
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
Hi Les,

There is no rush at all. I've been a mechanic since the 70's so I know that odd problems can take a great deal of time to sort out.

The engine in your tractor was one of their original V-twin designs updated with EFI. It's actually a very simple engine. John Deere has never done anything simple, so the electronics and fuel system have way more parts then needed!

Engine issues are limited to carbon build-up on the valves due to low running temps, some seal failures under the flywheel on the crankshaft end seal and the need to keep the valves adjusted being they have manual adjusters. If you keep the oil changed and put in some Chevron Techron (sp?) now and then to keep the valves clean, the motor will deliver a very long and trouble free life.

It is a metric engine so you will need metric tools. Most compression and oil pressure testers have the correct adapters with them, but you may need an adapter if you have an older set. You can probably just use an inline T fitting with some clamps for the fuel pressure test. I don't see where you will have any problems being you have experience using the equipment already.

I would take a few minutes to go over the machine and look for any secondary symptoms. It's nearly impossible to have the problem you are having unless something else is also going on.

Doug
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Ok Doug. I did all the tests and also noticed a few other things that may be helpful.

There is coolant low in the system. The overflow tank has the correct level but the radiator is about an inch below the neck. I'm guessing the radiator cap is bad and not allowing the coolant back into the radiator during cool down. I highly doubt any of the coolant is getting into the crankcase. The oil is not foamy at all. The dipstick is so clear it's hard to see the level. It's hard to smell the gas in the oil. Even though I have not changed the oil and have drained 6-9 oz of oil 3 times to get it back to the full mark, the oil still feels like it has some "slickness" to it.

The curved crankcase vent hose is clear and appears ok.

I blew air through the return line and the air boils the fuel in the tank. If it was plugged, it isn't any longer. There is a "T" in the return line with a hose running back to the throttle body. Not sure why. There is no vacuum at this line and it holds suction when I suck on it.

Before I started these tests, I drained all the oil and added fresh oil in case the old oil affected the compression and oil pressure readings.The oil was dark, thin, and not foamy. It still appeared to have some "slickness" to it. It was 9 oz over full. I did not change the oil filter.

Oil pressure is 25 at idle, 53 at full open RPM engine hot
Fuel pressure is 28 psi and falls back to 26 when the pump shuts off. It also shows 28 psi while running.
Compression is 195 psi in one cyl and 200 in the other.

I noticed that the spark plug in the left cyl is black. The dealer just installed these plugs 20 hrs ago. I checked the ignition coil on that cyl and it had 4.9 ohms between the spade terminals and 20,460 ohms from either spade terminal to the end of the plug wire.

In four hours of mowing it gains 8-9 ounces of oil and starts smoking out the muffler. The smoking gets worse when climbing a slight grade. I also notice a hydro lock sometimes when the motor is shut off and try to restart after a couple minutes. When this happens, and it does start, it misses terribbly and engaging the mower deck almost kills the engine. After it minute, it smooths out and performs ok.

The mower gets used about 80-90 hours a year. I service the oil and filter every spring. The air filter gets servied as needed a couple times during the summer. The fuel filter has been changed twice. The hydro filter also twice since I've had it.

I have never adjusted the valves, nor added any additives to keep the valves clean.

Hope this helps you address my problem. If you need me to check anything else, let me know. Les
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I have owned this mower many years but I did not buy it new. I don't remember how many hours it had on it when I got it but I'm guessing 600-800. It has 1706 hours on it now.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I almost forgot. This mower sheered off all the plastic teeth on the cam gear 100 hours ago at 1600 hrs.. I can't remember for sure but I think it's all one piece and they replaced the whole camshaft. If that's the case, I'm sure the valves would have gotten adjusted then. John Deere made the repair. They said that normally happens at 1200 hrs so it was a miracle it didn't do it till 1600 hrs.
Also, in the amount of time it took me to come in and write you the email with all the test results and go back out and re-assemble the mower, I started it. I'd say it sat for about half hour, 45 minutes. When I started it, it obviously was running on only one cylinder. About 5 seconds of this, the second cylinder kicked in, blew out a bunch of blue smoke and ran fine. I mowed for about 10 minutes and put it away. It ran fine for these ten minutes.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Come to think about it. This problem started when the cam shaft was replaced, or soon after, since the camshaft replacement was only 100 hrs ago. Could they have not adjusted the vaves? If they didn't, I don't see how that could contribute to this problem of making oil.
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
That's very interesting. If you had 8 oz of gas in the oil, you should have smelled it on dipstick or when you changed the oil. That is a good amount of gas. With the readings from your tests, I don't know how it would be possible to get gas into the crankcase. I have to check into the line running back to the throttle body. I'm not showing that on my hose diagram.

It's very possible valve damage could have resulted from the cam failure being cam timing would have changed. Your compression numbers are good though. A leakdown test would show for sure.

If it were mine, I'd check the valve adjustments, run a decarbonizing additive like Techron in the fuel and do a leakdown test if I didn't see results from doing the first two things. If you are game, I'll walk you through setting the valves. It's probably much easier then the work you've already done and no special tools are needed. I can also show you how to make and use a simple leakdown tester to check for valve damage.

Give me some time to dig into that hose to the throttle body. That would be a way for gas to enter the engine.

Doug
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Ok, where that "T" is in the return fuel line it doesn't look like it was something that was "factory" installed. It's actually a white colored "Y". Someone obviously added it because the hoses have jagged edges like somebody used their teeth to cut the hose. It's connected to a port on the left side of the throttle body towards the front. And the rubber hose is smaller than the fuel return line.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
You ever heard of the "COKE" bottle full of water trick, dumped into the carb of a hot running engine at fast idle? I don't know if this trick actually works but it's supposed to expand the water into vapor and break up carbon. Never tried it though.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I am also now wondering why I didn't smell gas in the oil. If it's not water or gas, what else could it be? If it was water, wouldn't the plug be white instead of black? I'm convinced something is going on with that left cylinder, because the plug is black, but what? Could it be unburnt fuel from a misfire?
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Ok, here's another clue. I failed to mention that the wife is the sole operator of this mower. I am doing other chores while she mows and I have seen this thing smoke from afar. This morning I posed the question to her as follows:
"Linda when that mower gets to smoking, is the smokie black, blue or white?" "White" she says. I said if it was white it would be losing ani-freeze. She responds, "Well I have been adding anti-freeze. It's always down an inch everytime I check the fluids before I use it." I did not know she was adding the anti-freeze and I always thought the smoke was blue. When have you ever known a woman to check the fluids?

So now, is it possible to be getting anti-freeze in the oil and the oil not be foamy? This would explain why the oil still has "slickness" to it when I examine the oil. What do you think about me pulling a valve cover and look inside? Do you think I will find a clue there, if there was water present in the crankcase? This would also explain the "hydro lock" after it sits a few minutes. Is it possible for water to get into the combustion chamber and still have good compression? Maybe the black plug was normal and I need to be looking at the other cylinder. Maybe I could re-check the compression while the engine is hot. Or I could warm it up and let it sit for a half hour, pull the spark plug and crank it over and see if any water shoots out. I'm thinking something happened when the plastic camshaft teeth sheered off, or it could be a coincidental head gasket problem?
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
OK, now we are getting somewhere.

If the water pump leaks, coolant goes directly into the crankcase and the oil will foam. If the head gasket leaks, the engine will smoke, you should smell a sweet smell in the exhaust, you may see water droplets on the plug and out the exhaust. My guess would be the leak is at the head gasket. It may only leak under certain conditions such as a high engine temp or when the motor is shut off and cooling and the parts are contracting. The repair is to remove the head and check the surfaces for warpage, then replace the gasket. It's also a great time to do a valve job and replace the valve guide seals. It's actually a very quick job on that motor and I can walk you through it if you decide to tackle it yourself.

It is normal for one of the plugs to burn darker. That's was one of the problems with those engines. The EFI system was supposed to help that, but a redesign of the intake tract is what should have been done. As long as the motor is always run at full throttle and you decarbonize the valves using an additive, it's not a big problem.

In theory the water trick would work being water does cause the carbon to peel off, but water can also damage the rings and other metal parts. I would opt for Chevron Techron. It's the product actually recommended by Kawasaki for their V-twin motors.

So at this point I think we need to narrow down the problem. If it is a coolant problem, the head gasket is the most probable cause. If it is a fuel problem, the extra hose thing is where I would start. That could easily be a source for extra gas to be getting into the engine.

I think we are getting a handle on the problem and it will be something that can be repaired so you will still get many more years out of your engine.

Doug
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Ok, so did you find out anything on that "extra" vacuum line? Is it supposed to be there? The plug that came out of the other side did look a normal "tan" color but only near the center electrode. Down deeper the insulator looked white. Can I just go ahead and rip the head off or what would you like me to do next? Les
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
You could do a cooling system pressure test, but if you are certain that it is a coolant leak on that cylinder, then the head will have to be removed.

Do you have the shop manual? If not, I will track down one for you. It's straight forward work. Drain the coolant, put motor on TDC on that cylinder and start removing parts. In addition to the shop manual, a digital camera come in handy so you know exactly what things looked like before you take them apart.

Doug
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I am still pissed off at the John Deere dealer. They failed to diagnose the problem this spring when I took it in there. They kept it for 3 weeks, threw fuel injectors and a fuel pressure regulator on there, charged me $965 and sent it back still broke. We haven't used it much this summer because of the severe drought, so I called them and asked if they wanted to take another crack at it. They said to try some different gas first. Really? Whats the success rate trying that? If it were you, would you demand that they give me some satisfaction and fix it, or would you just suck it up, not say a word and we fix it?

I'm leaning towards a phone call to see if they will fix it and give me a $965 credit towards the repair, and if they won't, then we shall fix it and cheat them out of the job at least. I would rather fix it myself then take it to another shop. The next nearest shop is 45 miles away to a small engine repair shop in Omaha.

I am a well driller and I am floored with work. Sundays are my only days off. Finding another grand to spend on it is also a problem. I could fix it but it would take me a few weeks to complete, which I don't mind if you don't. I don't get home at a good enough time most days to work on projects in the evening. I guess finding the time would be easier than finding the money. At least right now, that is if the John Deere dealer won't absorb some of the costs.

Another thing standing in the way is that I leave on a 10 vacation come sunday. About the pnly thing I could get done before I go is get the shop cleaned up to get ready for this project. It would have to wait till I get back.

A shop manual couldn't hurt, but I don't think this project will be to hard. I used to do valve jobs on Ford V-8"s all the time back in the 80's. I could probably get some future use out of that shop manual, if I bought one to cover the entire tractor. Would it be best if I just buy one from the John Deere dealer so it would cover the whole tractor, just in case you and I want to overhaul the hydro someday? LOL It may come to this, if we're going to make this engine last forever. I would rather buy a shop manual to cover the entire tractor, rather than just an engine manual, if I can afford one. Knowing John Deere, it's probably a $300 manual.

I also worry about how much of your time this is taking. I don't know if you're actually enjoying giving me a hand and want to see this project through, or if you would really like to wash your hands of me and move onto something else. Don't be afraid to let me know.
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.

Clearly the dealer you took the tractor to didn't have a handle on the problem. That happens. I was a mechanic and service manager for over 20 years and when I messed up, or one of the guys messed up, we made it right. I would speak directly to the owner and calmly explain that you have had to diagnose the problem on your own, been unable to fully use the machine all summer and you spent a good deal of money on parts you didn't need. Add that you are a local business owner and would like to see them put this right for you.

If that doesn't work, I'm happy to keep working with you until the problem is fixed. That's what I do. You are welcome to toss in a bonus at the end if you wish.

I have a link to the engine manual. The photos aren't good but the diagrams and text are ok. I also have the Clymer manual. The hose routing is on page 11 of that manual. See if that matches your return line layout.

 

http://www.moto-forge.com/answer/445.PDF

 

http://www.mymowerparts.com/pdf/Kawasaki-Service-and-Repair-Manuals/FD620D-FD661D-KAWASAKI-SERVICE-REPAIR-MANUAL.pdf



Engine parts can be purchased through JD or through any Kawasaki small engine seller online. If your dealer isn't willing to go good on some of the repair costs, I wouldn't be buying parts from them.

Doug

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
well your manual shows the "T" in the return line so what I have must be correct. I will get back to ya when I get home from vacation and the tractor is back in the shop if that's ok.

I notice you have a motorcycle, a vintage bike perhaps as a photo. My ten day vacation starts Sunday on my harley. Trip is planned for Arizona and New Mexico, but may be altered depending on the weather.
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
I specialize in vintage motorcycle restoration. That's pretty much all I do in the shop these days. I was injured in a car accident about 10 years ago so my repair work is limited. I own about 20 vintage/antique bikes.

Enjoy your vacation!

Doug
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Hey Doug,
back from vacation. Trip was awesome! A bad day on the harley beats a good day at work anytime!
Ok, I changed oil and used the mower again. I think I better wait till the mowing season is over before I do any engine tear down, whether it be me or convince the dealer to fix it. The last time this deere went back to the dealer, they had it 3 weeks. I think the yard may need mowed maybe 1 more time before the winter sets in. I got a nice warm shop to play with it when the time comes.
I suppose I could do a leak down test in the meantime or I could just do a tear off of the cylinder heads and see what I find in a few weeks when I'm finished with it. I'm pretty sure which cylinder to be looking at judging by the lighter colored plug, but I know to go ahead and do a valve job on both.

If I do a leakdown test I'm not sure what to do, but I remember using the hose from my compression gauge and compressed air to see where the leak may be, but it did pass a compression test so I'm not sure that would reveal anything. Since it passed the compression test and it's still loosing coolant, I'm guessing the problem only surfaces when it's warmed up. I'm betting a cylinder head tear off would reveal the problem.

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Oh, and I found and purchased a shop manual for this engine on ebay as well. It has not arrived yet.
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
Here is how to build and use a simple leakdown tester.

http://www.motorcycleproject.com/motorcycle/text/leakdown.html

That may or may not show anything being it's a coolant leak, although you may get bubbles in your cooling system. A cooling system pressure test is probably not going to show much either, being we already know it leaks and have a good idea where it is leaking. It could be used to pinpoint which head gasket, so it would have some value unless you are just going to redo both sides anyhow.

Doug
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Have you ever seen a warped or cracked head or is it always a fault within the gasket? Les

Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.

I've only seen one bad Kawasaki head in 30 years so chances are it's just a gasket leak. But always check the mating surfaces to verify they are perfectly level.

 

Let me know if you need more help. If not, please click on the accept button so I get credited for my work. If you don't do that then I get nothing for the time I have spent. Thanks.

Doug

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Hey Doug,
Sorry it's taken so long getting back to ya. Today the John Deere gets rolled into the just finished heated garage for repair. I have purchased a shop manual so am raring to go. Had to really scroll down the rmail list to find you again so your reply will put you back up on top of the list and easy to find. Hope all is well with you. Les
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
A heated garage would come in handy today being it's -18.

Doug
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
0 here in southwest Iowa this morning with a high of 16 forcast. You must be from up north. LOL
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
Near Duluth
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Ok I tore down the motor. spotted the problem right away. Tear in side of head gasket. The inside metal ring of the gasket looked intact but discolored where the tear was in the paper part of the gasket.

I also used my valve spring compressor and popped out the valves. Not much carbon build up on the intakes. I was expecting worse given the amount of hours on this machine. Do you think it's neccessary to do a valve job or can I just clean everything up and re-assemble? I took some pictures if you want to give me your email. Les
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
graphic
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
graphic
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
I'm not allowed to share my email.

If you can't feel a groove in the valves you can lap them in and check for a nice even lap pattern around the valve. If it looks good then, go ahead and use them. If the lap ring is too high, too low or real wide, or there are areas that don't lap properly, discard the valve.

To lap them, you can use the suction cup type tool from an auto parts store, or use a rubber fuel line that fits the valve stem. Put your compound on the valve face, install the valve, push the hose over the end of the valve stem and use that to turn the valve.

Doug
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Took the valves out and cleaned everything up. Had to go to small engine shop to buy parts anyway so I just took the heads along and had them check them. All looked good. I was worried because i didn't follow the instructions when I discovered after the fact to loosen the bolts in a pattern, which I didn't do.

Lapped the valves. All look good. Had to do the exhuast a couple times to get rid of the small pitting. Got all the parts washed and ready for assembly tomorrow. What's your opinion on using spray copper coat on the head gaskets? Or shall I just install them dry?
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
I don't have a set of those handy so I'm not sure what they are made of. They tend to change over the years and I have seen several styles. There is an all metal style with little dimples and a fiber style with a metal insert around the cylinder bore. There may be others. It they didn't come with instructions, let me know what it looks like. Most go on dry but I think that one uses RTV on the portion where the water passes though.

Doug
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
It is the grey fiber gasket with the wetal ring around the cylinder bore. No instructions came with them. The Kawasaki manual only states to handle with care and not scratch the plastic coating. It doesn't say anything about adding any sealant of any kind, even around the water passages.

The gasket looks just like the same McCord gaskets Ford used back in the 80's on their cylinder heads. I always gave them a coat of copper coat and never had any leaks, but those were cast iron heads on cast iron blocks. I've never worked with aluminum parts before. I'm a little leary about using RTV. The water jacket totally surounds the cylinder so it would take a lot of it and it would for sure get onto the metal ring as well.

There wasn't any sealant used on the factory gasket. Have you ever used the spray copper coat? It's goes on pretty thin and gets tacky.
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
I've used copper coat on copper gaskets. It sounds like the style with the sealant built into the gasket. I would install it dry.

Doug
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
ok, will do
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
I probably mentioned this, but I always surface the heads. Using a flat metal surfacing plate or glass sheet, I tape some fine wet/dry sand paper to it and lightly do a figure 8 with the head on it. If you spot any high or low spots, a machine shop may need to touch that up. If not, you are good to go. It gives the gasket a perfect surface to bond to.

Doug
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Ok, I got it all back together and running.. I "planed" them on a flat surface with fine sandpaper as you suggested, and after much thought, went ahead and used the spray on copper coat gasket sealant to just make sure evrything was going to seal. I decided that there probably wasn't much harm done in doing this as I have had no problems with the use of it in the past.

I adjusted the valves, and re-assmbled. everything. Cycled the fuel pump a couple times and it fired right up. I let it run for 15 minuted and changed the oil & filter. I sharpened the blades and scraped out the grass from the mower deck and took it out to the shed and let it run for 5 hours and shut it off.

Today, I will go out and check the fluid levels to see if anythjing "gained" or "lost". If all of the fluid levels are ok, I'd say we got her licked. Before, she would gain a 1/2 inch on the oil dipstick in four hours of run time. Les
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
Sounds good.

Doug
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
So, what have you found? Is it good to go?

Doug
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Sorry, got busy and haven't had time to look. I need to go out and check the fluid levels, but I have a new snow drift in front of the shed to remove to get to it. Supposed to be in the 40's here the next few days. so that should be some incentive to get to it. Les
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
OK, just curious about the outcome.

Doug
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Ok I checked the mower. I think it's ok. The oil level was about 1/8" above the full line, but if I remember correctly it has always read slightly overfull with the correct amount of oil in it. The antifreeze was at the cold level on the overfull tank. The radiator was brim full. The oil on the dipstick looked clear as new. I guess the real test will come if it can survive the wife when mowing season starts. LOL
I guess it's safe to move onto the next project. The wife has decided she may want to start a garden this year. I have a 1976 1200 Cub Cadet with a creeper gear and roto tiller attachment. I've never used the tiller before so will have to get all the brackets rounded up and see if I can figure out how that goes together. Thanks Doug for all your help. If I have any future problems is there any way to request you for a help person or will I just get somebody at random? Les
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
Glad to hear it working and you won't need a new one like the dealer suggested!

You can request me or put my name in the title of the question and I will see it. I specialize in Kawasaki products.

Please click on the accept or rating button when finished so I get credited for my answer.

Doug
Doug E., Kawasaki Master Technician
Category: Small Engine
Satisfied Customers: 2883
Experience: Professional mechanic since the late 70's on Kawasaki, Arctic Cat, Jonsered, John Deere and others.
Doug E. and 3 other Small Engine Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Ok, One last question. I was thinking about becoming an expert in my field of well drilling. How well does this job pay? Les
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
The top rate is 50% of the money from answers that are accepted. I average $1 to $2 per hour.

Doug
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I figured it would be much more.
Expert:  Doug E. replied 1 year ago.
So did I. LOL

Doug

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Tory Johnson, GMA Workplace Contributor, discusses work-from-home jobs, such as JustAnswer in which verified Experts answer people’s questions.
I will tell you that...the things you have to go through to be an Expert are quite rigorous.
 
 
 

What Customers are Saying:

 
 
 
  • You did one super job of explaining to me everything there is to know about this fridge. I'm looking forward to asking you questions in the future. Jimmy Bagley, IA
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  • You did one super job of explaining to me everything there is to know about this fridge. I'm looking forward to asking you questions in the future. Jimmy Bagley, IA
  • Wonderful service, prompt, efficient, and accurate. Couldn't have asked for more. I cannot thank you enough for your help. Mary C. Freshfield, Liverpool, UK
  • This expert is wonderful. They truly know what they are talking about, and they actually care about you. They really helped put my nerves at ease. Thank you so much!!!! Alex Los Angeles, CA
  • Thank you for all your help. It is nice to know that this service is here for people like myself, who need answers fast and are not sure who to consult. GP Hesperia, CA
  • I couldn't be more satisfied! This is the site I will always come to when I need a second opinion. Justin Kernersville, NC
  • Just let me say that this encounter has been entirely professional and most helpful. I liked that I could ask additional questions and get answered in a very short turn around. Esther Woodstock, NY
  • Thank you so much for taking your time and knowledge to support my concerns. Not only did you answer my questions, you even took it a step further with replying with more pertinent information I needed to know. Robin Elkton, Maryland
 
 
 

Meet The Experts:

 
 
 
  • Curtis B.

    Technician

    Satisfied Customers:

    6989
    have worked on and around most engine models for 35 yrs./Polaris ATV expert
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  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/KO/koboma/2012-6-6_20917_DSCF1022.64x64.JPG Curtis B.'s Avatar

    Curtis B.

    Technician

    Satisfied Customers:

    6989
    have worked on and around most engine models for 35 yrs./Polaris ATV expert
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/SM/SmEngPro/2012-8-5_3564_Rick1206290005Edit.fullres.logo.scrn.64x64.jpg Rick's Avatar

    Rick

    Factory Authorized Trainer

    Satisfied Customers:

    4126
    Outdoor Power Equipment technical trainer since 1990, covering eight states.
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/GI/giftindex/2011-11-19_2715_JamesLWells500.64x64.jpg James W's Avatar

    James W

    Small Engine Troubleshooting Expert

    Satisfied Customers:

    2978
    7 years as Mechanic & Parts Manager for Brother who has Owned Lawn & Garden Repair shop for 35 years
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/jonrk/2010-1-5_22551_jon.jpg Jon K.'s Avatar

    Jon K.

    Small Engine Diagnostic Expert

    Satisfied Customers:

    2950
    Gold certified Stihl tech, Service Manager for a rental/repair shop.Certified in most small engines
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/MR/mr2cycle/2011-3-12_03458_sears.64x64.jpg Vince O.'s Avatar

    Vince O.

    Small Engine Technician

    Satisfied Customers:

    2374
    Over 30 years experience repairing lawn and garden equipment. Chainsaws, mowers,blowers and trimmers
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/rheisnger/2010-12-31_010856_41385_100001225699183_7012_q.jpg RUSS's Avatar

    RUSS

    SERVICE TECHNICIAN

    Satisfied Customers:

    1723
    28 YEAR SERVICE TECHNICIAN
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/BriggsEngines/2010-02-26_230200_n1834842973_4823.jpg CJBennett's Avatar

    CJBennett

    Small Engine Technician

    Satisfied Customers:

    623
    Briggs and Stratton Master Service Tech, Kohler, Tecumseh, Kawasaki certified. 18 years exp.