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David L
David L, Lawyer
Category: Real Estate Law
Satisfied Customers: 3255
Experience:  Attorney licensed in multiple jurisdictions.
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I have to terminate my lease in Florida o a single family

Customer Question

I have to terminate my lease in Florida o a single family house 5 months early due to health reasons. There is no termination agreement in the lease. The landlord wants five months rent. Do I have any options? Rent is $3000 a month.
Submitted: 5 months ago.
Category: Real Estate Law
Expert:  David L replied 5 months ago.
Hi and thanks for asking your question. My name is ***** ***** I will be assisting you. I am a Florida licensed attorney. Unfortunately, there is no Florida law that would allow you to terminate early for health reasons. However, if you do terminate, the landlord is required to mitigate his potential damages by attempting to relet your apartment to a new tenant. Meaning, he can't just sit around for the next five months collecting rent from you without trying to re-rent the apartment. The bad news, however, is that in the event he can't find a new tenant, you are legally on the hook for the next five months until he does. If you leave, you do risk that he comes after you. But he can't just collect five months from you. He has to take action to rent the apartment. If it is a popular apartment and you think he can rent it fairly quickly, it might be worth simply leaving and making him find a new tenant. However, if you don't think he will be able to rent it fairly quickly, the risk is there that you would be accountable for the remaining rent, even though you are no longer living there.

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