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Loren
Loren, Lawyer
Category: Real Estate Law
Satisfied Customers: 29111
Experience:  30 years of real estate practice experience.
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I signed my new lease agreement which is supposed to start

Customer Question

I signed my new lease agreement which is supposed to start May 1st. Can I give my landlord notice to vacate before the lease is enforceable? I live in Tacoma WA
Submitted: 8 months ago.
Category: Real Estate Law
Expert:  Loren replied 8 months ago.
Good afternoon. I am Loren, a licensed attorney, and I look forward to assisting you.
Expert:  Loren replied 8 months ago.
Is the lease signed by you? Does it provide for termination prior to taking possession of the premises?
Customer: replied 8 months ago.
Yes, I signed the lease. The only provision is for going to assisted living. This is s renewal lease. Been here three years.
Expert:  Loren replied 8 months ago.
Thank you for the additional information. I am sorry to hear of your dilemma. I realize how frustrating this is for you and I hope to provide you information which is accurate and useful, even though it may not be the news you were hoping to get.
Expert:  Loren replied 8 months ago.
Unfortunately, unless the lease provides otherwise, the agreement is enforceable as soon as you sign it. So, accordingly, you would not have a right to terminate before the commencement date unless the landlord agreed.You can ask the landlord if they will allow you to terminate. You can negotiate a lump sum settlement to cut off further liability or try to find a tenant to replace you. The important thing is that, if you are able to negotiate an exit, you must get a signed release from the landlord. That way the landlord can not come at you later to enforce the lease.
Expert:  Loren replied 8 months ago.
I realize this is probably not the answer you were hoping to receive. Also, please remember that this is not necessarily a moral judgement on my part. As a professional, however, I am sometimes placed in the position of having to deliver news which is not favorable to a customer's legal position, but accurately reflects their position under the law. I hate it, but it happens and I only ask that you not penalize me with a bad or poor rating for having to deliver less than favorable news.

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