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Barrister
Barrister, Lawyer
Category: Real Estate Law
Satisfied Customers: 33770
Experience:  15 years real estate, Realtor. Landlord 26 years
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My property taxes were raised by 117.5% this year. The

Customer Question

My property taxes were raised by 117.5% this year. The property was under homestead exemption by the previous owner and is now filed by me last year. I have a hearing pending and am under the impression that homestead exemptions convey and that there is not a lapse due to change of ownership that allows the county to legally raise my property taxes by more than 10%. I am gathering info for the hearing and would like to have the facts needed to insure compliance by the county tax board. Thank you
Submitted: 10 months ago.
Category: Real Estate Law
Expert:  Barrister replied 10 months ago.

Hello and welcome! My name is ***** ***** I am a licensed attorney who will try my very best to help with your situation or get you to someone who can. There may be a slight delay in my responses as I research statutes or ordinances and type out an answer or reply, but rest assured, I am working on your question.

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According to the TX Comptroller of Public Accounts, if you buy or sell a home that has only a general homestead exemption on it, the exemption normally stays in place for that entire tax year. The final taxes for the year will reflect the exemption. However, the new owner will have to qualify for the exemption by filing an application in his or her own name for the following year.

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So if you failed to file your own application for the exemption, then that is likely why there was such a big increase. If you are 65 or older or permanently disabled you get additional exemptions and if you are a veteran who is 100% disabled, you get a total property tax exemption.

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But if you don't qualify for any exemptions, or failed to file for one, then you can be taxed on the entire fair market value of the property.

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See here for more details: http://comptroller.texas.gov/taxinfo/proptax/exemptions.html

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thanks

Barrister

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