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Tina
Tina, Lawyer
Category: Real Estate Law
Satisfied Customers: 5436
Experience:  17 years of legal experience including real estate law.
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I purchased a house in a gated community where I reside and

Customer Question

I purchased a house in a gated community where I reside and my special needs daughter. I was told my youngest son could not live with me or be put on the title to my house because he owes back child support. He has worked steady for three years and has
his child support as well as back child support taken directly from his paycheck. I own the home but pay space rent! He has applied to several different apartment houses and has been accepted due to his high credit score. Is it legal for my landlord to deny
him housing with me due to back child support?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Real Estate Law
Expert:  Irwin Law replied 1 year ago.

I am not sure that I understand your situation. Do you own your home, or rent it? What do you mean by "I pay space rent"?

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I own my home but I do not own the property! So I still pay to live in the community!
Expert:  Irwin Law replied 1 year ago.

In that case, the rules and regulations of the community which owns the real estate control the rights of the home owners . Such rules and regulations are legal, but they must be applied to all residents equally and they should be reasonable. A court would probably find a restriction based on owing back child support to be unreasonable, at least in my opinion. You can file suit against the community to declare the rule to be invalid.

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