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Barrister
Barrister, Lawyer
Category: Real Estate Law
Satisfied Customers: 35364
Experience:  16 years real estate, Realtor. Landlord 26 years
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Need an opinion about a new situation in regards to my

Customer Question

Need an opinion about a new situation in regards ***** ***** retail store space rental. Located in a strip mall that has front and back stores. Recently 1 tenant moved out 6+ months ago and space is still empty and my neighbor is closing down in 2 months. When they close I will be the only retail space in the back. I just renewed my lease for another 3 years but curious if I still have any "room" to negotiate my rent or even bring up a past offer by the landlord. 6+ months ago my landlord offered to give me a store space in the front of the building for "X" a month however I couldn't afford that at the time so I passed on it. The same business is located in the front and they are still struggling. Curious if I have a slight chance to get front space with all of these things in mind and if it's worth it to proceed and get a local attorney.
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Real Estate Law
Expert:  Barrister replied 1 year ago.

Hello and welcome! My name is ***** ***** I will try my level best to help with your situation or get you to someone who can.

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This is a situation of "nothing ventured, nothing gained" and what I mean is that there is no harm in asking the landlord to see if he would allow you to move locations up front and see what he said. But legally you wouldn't have any grounds to force him to negotiate with you if he refused.

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However, you could gain a bit of leverage but telling him that business was bad around back and you might have to close up or move elsewhere if you couldn't get some better frontage to drive business into the store. It is something of a game of chicken, because you probably aren't actually considering this, but you might be able to bluff him into believing it. No one wants to be the last store in a mall and businesses feed off other businesses and drive traffic to each other. So it is beneficial for the landlord to have front spaces filled, as that doesn't portray a dying strip mall, and it is obviously beneficial to you to have the exposure.

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So the bot***** *****ne is that you can ask, and then subtly allude to the fact that you might have to close up if things don't change, and then see if that would be enough to bring him to the table..

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But as to hiring an attorney, he isn't going to be able to do a better job than you could as there is not any legal leverage here for him to use to force the landlord to the table..

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thanks

Barrister