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Bud, Plumber
Category: Plumbing
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Experience:  22 Years Field Experience - 17 Years Business Ownership - Residential or Light Commercial
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How do you hook up two water heaters? I have 1 for the kitchen

Resolved Question:

How do you hook up two water heaters? I have 1 for the kitchen area and two on the other side of the house for the living areas. These are the large ones (about 4.5 ft tall). There doesn't seem to be any more reserve than if it were one. Currently there is cold in split by a T with each leg going into the intake of both. Output from both merge to another T going to one that feeds the house. There is a cut off valve on each leg of the intake side.
Submitted: 7 years ago.
Category: Plumbing
Expert:  Mario replied 7 years ago.

it is verry important that the all the pipes are equal length and size for instance

 

all 4 pipes ( 2 for the cold in and 2 for the hot out ) should be XX inches by XX inches ( 3/4 1/2 ect ect )

 

and all the lines that twin togher ( go to the tee ) should be the same size

 

now some people say the water heaters should be the same size in all aspects ( hight width gallon size ) i also agree with that as well

just remember

 

from one heater its cold in and from cold in it

then hot out to cold in on the other heater

 

then its hot out of the other heater

Customer: replied 7 years ago.
When you say equal size for the 4 pipes, you mean all 3/4 inch, etc, but not same length such as 2 ft for each one. I assume you mean running them in series where one preheats and sends it's supply to the other then out to house. I f that is the case you only need one pipe, right? In from the supply, out with the one piece to in on the other, and then out to the house. The main in and the out to house are already there.
Expert:  Mario replied 7 years ago.
yes do your best to keep them all the same length up to the tee where they go to the system ( its verry impprtant )
Customer: replied 7 years ago.
Dude, did you even read my question? In to one and out to another only uses one piece of pipe. The input is ?? length b/c it comes from the street. The final output is?? length b/c it runs to the whole house. The only piece is the one going from the output of one to the input of the other.
Customer: replied 7 years ago.
Relist: I still need help.
Response had two different answers to the same question, both of which conflicted with the other.
Expert:  Bud replied 7 years ago.

I am Bud - Another online "Plumbing Consultant"


Your heaters are plumbing in parallel and you are wanting to change to series plumbing, I think. With parallel plumbing, Mario is correct, every pipe, tank, fitting has to be the same length for restriction purposes. With series it doesn't matter about pipe length. The draw back to series plumbing is, the primary heater will do all the work. It is very possible some buildup in the bottom of one of the tanks is causing the lack of adequate hot water.

 

graphic

 

 

 


I hope the above information helps, if it does not please let me know.

 

 

 

If you leave POSITIVE FEEDBACK for me you deserve a

 

 

Customer: replied 7 years ago.
Thanks. One more question. My water heaters are only 6 yrs old but it really feels like I am drawing from one by the amt of hot water I have. I do not believe my parallel set up is correct. From your answer and Mario's. I conclude that either one should work if done correctly. It seems like the series setup is easier to hook up. I also assume that the first heater (from street) should be set 1/2 of your desired temp, and the second (going to house) set at desired temp? If this is correct, will it provide more volume of hot water. which is better. Parallel or series.
Expert:  Bud replied 7 years ago.

I am Bud - Your personal online "Plumbing Consultant"


Series is much less problematic.

 

Both will give the same amount of hot water, in theory... I would set both themps the same. If you set the first at a lower temp it will require both heaters to run every time, if you set both the same the secondary heater should only come on when you have a large demand for hot water.

 

My opinion is series.

 

 

 


I hope the above information helps, if it does not please let me know.

 

 

 

If you leave POSITIVE FEEDBACK for me you deserve a

 

 

Bud, Plumber
Category: Plumbing
Satisfied Customers: 556
Experience: 22 Years Field Experience - 17 Years Business Ownership - Residential or Light Commercial
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