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Dr. Chenoa
Dr. Chenoa, Veterinarian
Category: Pet
Satisfied Customers: 217
Experience:  Tufts University graduate, special interest in exotic medicine
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WHY DOES MY RABBIT HIDE IN A CORNER

Customer Question

I HAVE 6 MONTH OLD DOUBLE LION HEAD DWARF RABBIT, SHE IS NOT FIXED, NIETHER IS SHE SOCIABLE, DOES NOT LIKE BEING TOUCHED ONLY BRUSHED.
BUT SHE ALWAYS COMES OUT AND BINKIES EVERY EVENING AND SEEMS TO BE FINE AND INVESTIGATES EVERYTHING, BUT FOR 3 DAYS ALL SHE IS DOING IS SHE COMES OUT OF HER HOUSE AND GOES TO A CORNER AND STAYS THERE IF ONLY I AM HOME I CAN COACH HER OUT BUT SHE JUST TO BE ACTING WEIRD, POSSIBLY WHAT COULD IT BE. CONCERNED OWNER
Submitted: 10 years ago.
Category: Pet
Expert:  Dr. Chenoa replied 10 years ago.
Hi,
It sounds like something is definately off. It is possible that she has a fever or is in pain. If she is not eating normally, or has fewer or smaller sized droppings, this alone can cause great discomfort in the abdomen and the signs you're describing, and should be addressed by a vet that sees rabbits immediately. I consider any rabbit that hasn't eaten much in 24 hours to be an emergency. Dental problems, including overgrown teeth, are another condition that could cause pain and the symptoms you're describing. The teeth that tend to overgrow are in the back of the mouth, and would not be readily visible to you. It is unlikely because she is not spayed yet, as the behavior change is so abrupt, it does not sound hormonal. However, down the line, she needs to be spayed once her current problem is resolved, as 85% of female rabbits will develop uterine cancer by the time they are 4 years old. If you need help finding rabbit vets in your area, please let me know, but she should be seen today. Good luck,
Dr. Chenoa