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Ask Dr. Michael Salkin Your Own Question
Dr. Michael Salkin
Dr. Michael Salkin, Veterinarian
Category: Dog
Satisfied Customers: 24471
Experience:  University of California at Davis graduate veterinarian with 44 years of experience
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My dog has a bunch of blisters and redness around her mouth.

Customer Question

my dog has a bunch of blisters and redness around her mouth. she just ended her first period last week
JA: I'll do all I can to help. What seems to be the problem with your dog?
Customer: she has a bunch of blisters around her mouth or pimples and around her mouth is red
JA: Where does your dog seem to hurt?
Customer: she isnt
JA: Can you see anything that looks wrong or different?
Customer: blisters
JA: Is your dog eating normally?
Customer: yes
JA: OK. No appetite problems. Is your dog having trouble peeing or pooing?
Customer: no
JA: OK. No obvious problems there. How is your dog behaving differently?
Customer: looks like cold sore blisters.
JA: What is the dog's name and age?
Customer: no
JA: Is there anything else important you think the Veterinarian should know about your dog?
Customer: lulu and she is 9 months
JA: I'm sending you to a secure page on JustAnswer so you can place the $5 fully refundable deposit now. While you're filling out that form, I'll tell the Veterinarian about your situation and connect you two.
Submitted: 8 months ago.
Category: Dog
Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 8 months ago.

Can you upload a close-up photo(s) of representative skin to our conversation? You can use the paperclip icon in the toolbar above your message box (if you can see the icon) or you can use an external app such as dropbox.com/ I can be more accurate if I can see what you're seeing.

Customer: replied 8 months ago.
anyway I can email the pics???
Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 8 months ago.

Yes, you can email them to***@******.*** and support will forward them to me. This can take up to 24 hours but I promise to reply as soon as I review them.

Customer: replied 8 months ago.
here they are
Customer: replied 8 months ago.
couple more
Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 8 months ago.

Thank you! Those pics represent a chin pyoderma (also called canine acne). Chin pyoderma is a bacterial infection that isn't a true acne but rather is a traumatic furunculosis. Short, stiff hairs are forced backward through the hair follicle, creating a sterile foreign body reaction that may become subsequently infected. This may be induced by trauma to the chin (e.g., caused by lying on hard floors, friction from chew toys). It's common in short-coated dogs, especially when 3-12 months old.

Treatment and prognosis is as follows:

1) Trauma and pressure to the chin should be minimized.

2) The area should be scrubbed with benzoyl peroxide or chlorhexidine shampoo in the direction of hair growth. This mechical scrubbing to remove "ingrown hairs" is important for preventing future lesions and speeding resolution. These shampoos are available over the counter in pet/feed stores or at Lulu's pet hospital.

3) The prescription mupirocin ointment or benzoyl peroxide gel (available over the counter) should be applied every day until lesions resolve, then every 3-7 days as needed for control. If response if poor, systemic antibiotics should be administered for a minimum of 4-6 weeks and continued 2 weeks beyond complete clinical resolution.

4) Adhesive tape (Elasticon, e.g.) can be used to tape strip the "ingrown hairs" making hair removal easy.

5) The prognosis is good. In many dogs the lesions resolve permanently; however, some dogs require lifelong routine topical therapy for control.

Please continue our conversation if you wish.

Customer: replied 8 months ago.
basicly you want me to wash her face with an antibacterial soap and use a dog cream on her face? how do they get it? Thanks a million michael
Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 8 months ago.

Basically yes, but the best topical antibiotic - mupirocin - needs to be prescribed by her vet. You can see how the benzoyl peroxide gel affects her instead. You can find that in your local pharmacy. Please see my paragraph starting with "Thank you!" above for the possible causes. You're welcome. I can't set a follow-up in this venue so please return to our conversation - even after rating - with an update at your convenience.

Customer: replied 8 months ago.
Thanks doc. one more question. She broke out after I had her at the dog groomer. So by your diagnosis there is no way she caught something there?
Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 8 months ago.

Perhaps she rubbed her muzzle on a hard surface at the grooming parlor. As mentioned above, lying on hard floors is a risk factor.

Customer: replied 8 months ago.
Thanks doctor. Very very much.
Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 8 months ago.

You're quite welcome.

Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 8 months ago.
Hi,
I'm just following up on our conversation about your pet. How is everything going?
Dr. Michael Salkin