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petdrz.
petdrz., Dog Veterinarian
Category: Dog
Satisfied Customers: 7267
Experience:  Over 30 years of experience in caring for dogs and cats.
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I've paid the requested questionnaire price and am

Customer Question

Hello doctor, I've paid the requested questionnaire price and am hoping to receive an answer as soon as possible regarding immediate action to take regarding my 10 pound yorkie who ate about three grapes 2-3 hours ago. Wondering if this number of grapes
is very serious or perhaps he will be fine.
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Dog
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I appreciate greatly appreciate your advice and your time
Expert:  petdrz. replied 1 year ago.

The problem with grape ingestion is that not every dog is susceptible - many animals can tolerate large quantities of grapes or raisins without problems. Nobody knows what the patient risk factors are (other than ingestion). Grape ingestion can lead to acute kidney disease and the lowest recorded amounts that caused problems was .7 oz/kg. In a dog of his size that would be about 3 oz of grapes. It sounds like he may have ingested less than that.

If he ingested more than that or if you want to be extra cautious, the next step would be decontamination. It is too late to induce vomiting at this point. Activated charcoal treatment (to reduce absorption) followed by IV fluid therapy for 36-72 hours along with monitoring of kidney function for several days. If there is no kidney damage after 3 days, it is likely he will not be affected. If signs of kidney disease develop, supportive treatment should be instituted.

These cases are always hard to decide how aggressive to be because you never know if they are going to be the one that is sensitive to the toxic principle or not. If you wait too long and then discover he is, your likelihood of reversing the process if diminished. If you are proactive and act now with decontamination efforts and support for the kidney function now, there is a chance it is overkill and he wouldn't have needed it, but unfortunately, there is no way to know which he is.

I hope this is helpful. Please let me know if you have ANY other questions. My goal is to give you 100% satisfaction and if you are not yet satisfied, please reply so I can clarify for you.

Dr Z

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Thanks for your response Dr. Z.
The thing with his particular case is that unfortunately he has been given grapes in the past unbeknownst to me they being toxic. It has been in low doses but not as much as this time. All the previous times he has been fine. Taking into account your feedback, I'm assuming he is not that sensitive since he has ingested before and been ok. He has ingested below the five grape mark which should put him in the clear. Are my assumptions correct or do you feel that more treatment is required?
Expert:  petdrz. replied 1 year ago.

I am sorry, but I must have logged off right before you replied.

We do know that some dogs and cats can eat a large amount of grapes without a problem and we don't know why others are affected by a smaller number. I would say in his case, based on previous exposure, since he didn't seem to have a problem and since yesterday's ingestion was a small amount, he will probably be in the clear. If he were my dog, I would consider at least having a creatinine or BUN checked at 24 and 48 hours (which would be today and tomorrow). These are a indicator of kidney function and would allow you to monitor for any evidence of kidney involvement. If both checks were in the normal range, I would say he is safe.