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Ask Dr. Louis Gotthelf Your Own Question
Dr. Louis Gotthelf
Dr. Louis Gotthelf, Veterinarian
Category: Dog
Satisfied Customers: 2438
Experience:  Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, Owner of a small animal clinic and an ear/skin clinic 35 years
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Maxwell, a now 13 month old Beabull 3/4 Eng. Bulldog has two

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Maxwell, a now 13 month old Beabull 3/4 Eng. Bulldog has two Prolapse Urethra Repair surgeries within two months. The first at 10 mos, second at 12. The first did not hold, with a return of the prolapse. The second there are complications. The doctor that did the surgery claims there is an abundance of scarred tissue now due to the two surgeries. But I have lost confidence in him at this point. The first surgery left insufficient scarred tissue to hold back his urethra. Maxwell is now experiencing incontinence, and is unable to form a stream (dribbling) when urinating. Max is just a young dog, and seems disturbed by these symptoms. I live in NYC and am looking for assistance.

Dr. Louis Gotthelf :

Hi. I'm Dr. Gotthelf. I have been a vet for 33 years and I would like to use my experience to help you with your pet's medical problem.

Dr. Louis Gotthelf :

A prolapsed urethra in a male bulldog puppy sually occurs because of increased pressure from coughing or from breathing too heavily with small nares or a soft palate problem. You did not mention if these are present in your pup.

Dr. Louis Gotthelf :

If the surgeries that have been done are not helping, then it may be necessary to have a pre-scrotal urethrostomy made to open the urethra before it gets to the penis.

Dr. Louis Gotthelf :

Too many urethral surgeries cause scar tissue to form in the urethral opening and even if it does not prolapse, the opening will be smaller and it may be more difficult for the puppy to urinate.

Customer:

This is very difficult to read that my "baby" will have to live with this narrow opening. My dog seems mostly disturbed by the incontinence (trying to cover the urine up in the house). We have placed a permanent wee-wee pad in our house in the case of an incomplete emptying of the bladder.

Customer:

That was sent prematurely. Would you recommend a balloon to stretch the scarred tissue for a modest treatment. Max is not retaining an uncomfortable amount of urine (his last to bladder scans were close to empty.) It seems like the doctor should have removed the original scarred tissue? Is it appropriate to consider legal action? Another question is if an second opening is made, will this help the incontinence, and will the original urethra opening close? Thank you so much.

Dr. Louis Gotthelf and 2 other Dog Specialists are ready to help you
If the new opening is made between the anus and the opening of the urethra, in the pre-scrotal area, then the only control of the urine is from the urethral muscle. There is a drug called phenylpropanolamine that will cause the urethral muscle to remain contracted, so that there will not be leakage. If this opening is made, the urine will not go to the end of the penis where all of the scar tissue has been made. I do not think that a balloon tipped catheter will open it up permanently.