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Sally G.
Sally G., Dog Training Consultant
Category: Dog
Satisfied Customers: 9445
Experience:  Service/assistance dog training/ behavior /obedience/Therapy dog Evaluator/AKC Evaluator
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My puppy wont stop barking and biting at me

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My puppy won't stop barking and biting at me agressively and when i tell her no she jumps back and starts barking continously.... how can i make sure that she isn't going to be an agressive dog when she gets older? and make her stop agressively biting and barking at me.

HICustomer

This is normal puppy behavior but should not be tolerated. I am going to suggest that yo sign her up for a puppy kindrgarden training class. This will you to learn ways of dealing with other situations as well, and the pup will get the socialization skills it need to become a well rounded family dog.

Biting:

Your pup has not yet learned what bite inhibition is. This is very common among young pups. The more you try to dissuade them they comes back even stronger, the more fuss you make the more excited they get. Sometimes even working themselves into a puppy frenzy. When pups are among their litter mates this is how they learn bite inhibition. Two pups engage in play, one pup gets too rough causing pain to the other pup, the hurt pup gives a yelp and walks away leaving the offending pup to wonder why play has ended. The more this happens the sooner the offending pup learns that it must not bite too hard or there is no play time with his siblings.With that being explained I want you to try that. When your pup bites, no matter how hard, yelp and walk away. Come back one minute later (no longer than one minute or the pup will have forgotten the whole episode) and repeat the process. I want everyone in the family to do this so the pup learns there is to be no biting at all. If you do this for a day to two days in a row the pup should soon subside.Another thing you could try during this training period is to buy some Granniks Bitter apple at the pet store and spray your hands. Pups do not usually like the smell or taste, (although there are always exceptions.) Once the pup smells or tastes this enough it will associate that smell with your skin and your hands won't be so inviting anymore.

When the pup’s biting has subsided remember to praise him for good behavior. Have him sit whenever he is near you and give him a treat, this will reinforce good behavior.

Barking:

This is your pups way of getting your attention. If you yell at the pup while he is barking he thinks you are part of the pack and barking also, which reinforces his barking.

Teaching the pup the commands 'speak ' and 'quiet' will usually help with this. You will need to have handy a bowl of yummy treats that the dog does not usually get, like cheese chunks or hot dog pieces. To teach speak, contiuously ask the dog to speak when he is already barking, then give him a yummy reward. When the pup is awaiting the next treat he will most likely look at you for one brief quiet moment, that is the time you want to say "quiet" and quickly treat him so he begins to understand what each command means. If you've asked for quiet and he barks, ignore him, this will have him wanting to figure out what to do to get the next treat.

I am going to diret you to a site on clicker training which is easy and fun, and can be done at home. I don not want you to skip any steps, print off a copy to keep for yourself in case you need to refer back to something. You will need a clicker which can be found in most pet stores for about three dollars or less.

www.clickerlessons.com

I hope this helps,Sally

 

HICustomer

This is normal puppy behavior but should not be tolerated. I am going to suggest that yo sign her up for a puppy kindergarten training class. This will you to learn ways of dealing with other situations as well, and the pup will get the socialization skills it need to become a well rounded family dog.

Biting:

Your pup has not yet learned what bite inhibition is. This is very common among young pups. The more you try to dissuade them they comes back even stronger, the more fuss you make the more excited they get. Sometimes even working themselves into a puppy frenzy. When pups are among their litter mates this is how they learn bite inhibition. Two pups engage in play, one pup gets too rough causing pain to the other pup, the hurt pup gives a yelp and walks away leaving the offending pup to wonder why play has ended. The more this happens the sooner the offending pup learns that it must not bite too hard or there is no play time with his siblings.With that being explained I want you to try that. When your pup bites, no matter how hard, yelp and walk away. Come back one minute later (no longer than one minute or the pup will have forgotten the whole episode) and repeat the process. I want everyone in the family to do this so the pup learns there is to be no biting at all. If you do this for a day to two days in a row the pup should soon subside.Another thing you could try during this training period is to buy some Granniks Bitter apple at the pet store and spray your hands. Pups do not usually like the smell or taste, (although there are always exceptions.) Once the pup smells or tastes this enough it will associate that smell with your skin and your hands won't be so inviting anymore.

When the pup’s biting has subsided remember to praise him for good behavior. Have him sit whenever he is near you and give him a treat, this will reinforce good behavior.

Barking:

This is your pups way of getting your attention. If you yell at the pup while he is barking he thinks you are part of the pack and barking also, which reinforces his barking.

Teaching the pup the commands 'speak ' and 'quiet' will usually help with this. You will need to have handy a bowl of yummy treats that the dog does not usually get, like cheese chunks or hot dog pieces. To teach speak, continuously ask the dog to speak when he is already barking, then give him a yummy reward. When the pup is awaiting the next treat he will most likely look at you for one brief quiet moment, that is the time you want to say "quiet" and quickly treat him so he begins to understand what each command means. If you've asked for quiet and he barks, ignore him, this will have him wanting to figure out what to do to get the next treat.

I am going to direct you to a site on clicker training which is easy and fun, and can be done at home. I don not want you to skip any steps, print off a copy to keep for yourself in case you need to refer back to something. You will need a clicker which can be found in most pet stores for about three dollars or less.

http://www.clickerlessons.com/

I hope this helps,

Sally

 

Customer: replied 10 years ago.
do you think the fact that i got her at six weeks has anything to do with her behavior? she's 16 weeks right now, but i did get her two weeks early.... the biting thing makes sense, she's in puppy classes and has been, but she continues to do whatever it is she pleases... she's very stubborn and seems like from time to time she isn't even listening more so just looking at me.. paying attention for a second and walking off the other direction like HA i don't NEED to listen... i'm the boss

 

My apologies, I see the post went through twice.

Yes, dogs that stay with their litter mates for a longer period of time will learn bite inhibition through play, but most breeders will sell their dogs at eight weeks, which in my opinion is still too early, so you would have had the problem anyway. My pups stay with their mates until 10-12 weeks and they have not had any issues in this regard.

If your dog enjoys eating then I really suggest you try the clicker training, I can guarantee you she will pay attention to you the whole time. Not only will she pay attention to you but she will try doing everything she can until she gives you the response you are looking for just for the click and treat. Just keep the training sessions short, maybe fifteen to twenty minutes thee times a day. Pups get tired easily and then they don't respond anymore. You always want to end your training on a positive note to let her know she is doing a good job. If you get frustrated, stop training and try again later. Clicker training is based upon making the dog think of what you are asking it rather than using words in the beginning. Words or commands are incorporated after the dog has performed what you wanted it to do. Give it a try, I think you will be pleasantly surprised in her reaction to you as a leader.

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