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Dr. Smith
Dr. Smith, Veterinarian
Category: Dog
Satisfied Customers: 1368
Experience:  Veterinarian in Small Animal Practice for 13 years
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My dog has a molar that broken off and the vet is worried ...

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My dog has a molar that broken off and the vet is worried an absess will form. she recommends extraction of the tooth or a root canal and cap...... so far the pulp is not swollen and she thinks it can go a few weeks without attention. what do you suggest?

I share the same concerns as your vet!Wink

Tooth fractures of the premolars and molars are very common in dogs due to their propensity to chew on really hard substrates like bone and rawhide and hard toys.

The fracture CAN be monitored at this time if no pulp exposure is evident. I would recommend PULSE ANTIBIOTIC therapy be instituted with Clindamycin antibiotic and your pet's mouth be checked regularly for any signs of gingival swelling or infection approximate to the tooth. Antiinflammatories ( Rimadyl, Previcox, Deramaxx) can be used as needed if you think your pet is experiencing any kind of nerve sensitivity or tooth pain while you are monitoring the tooth.

Extraction is usually the treatment of choice in my practice as it is quick, more affordable, and requires no maintenance! Dogs have 42 teeth, losing one is really no big deal when taking into account their ability to compensate!

In clinics that offer periodontics, that is a great alternative, but will ultimately cost quite a bit more to get done! Add to that the crown can come loose, fracture, or need to be replaced in a short amount of time, and the cost really adds up!!

Monitoring can be done for months to sometimes years at home. Eventually , an extraction may need to be done, so prepare yourself for the inevitable!

I would consider the usage of both Oravet and the new Periodontal Vaccine from Pfizer if you are not already familiar with those products. Your vet can give you the specifics!!

Please remember to press "ACCEPT" upon reading this answer. I appreciate your trust in my professional knowledge and clinical experience. Please remember to leave feedback, as feedback affects my ratings and earnings.

Best Wishes to You and Your Pet!
Dr. Jodi L. Smith

Customer: replied 10 years ago.
Reply to Dr. Smith's Post: pulse antibiotic therapy?
oravet?
periodontal vaccine?

what are these things?

I am assuming you are going to talk to your vet about these topics....that's why I did not expound!

Briefly, pulse antibiotic therapy is where you deliver low doses of antibiotics to your pet over the course of weeks to months while they have any evidence of periodontal disease or a compromised tooth. Typically, your pet will start out on a higher dose to get bacterial numbers under control, and then slowly be tapered to a dosing of 1-2 x a week depending on your pet's specific needs. Antirobe or clindamycin is the antibiotic of choice for pulse therapy in pets with periodontal disease! This treatment can be used indefinitely pending the decision to extract a tooth or pursue a dental cleaning.

Oravet is a dental supplement that is used to help decrease the formation of dental tartar and plaque (with all their associated bacteria) from adhering to your pet's teeth! For more info, please check out:

http://www.oravet.us.merial.com/whatis.html

Pfizer's new dental vaccine holds great promise for pet's with compromised dental health due to periodontal disease or fractured teeth. The vaccine is new on the market since last year, so not all vets are carrying it.

Periodontal disease is one of the most common infectious diseases in the world in dogs and is caused by three different bacteria that make up plaque. The bacteria that cause most periodontitis are Porphyromonas gulae, Porphyromonas salivosa and Porphyromonas denticani. These bacteria have been associated with over 74% of dogs with periodontal disease and have also been linked to diseases of the heart, kidney and lungs. These bacteria have been linked as an important cause of aspiration pneumonia in humans.

Recently, new studies have suggested that these bacteria have long-term effects on bone loss related to the periodontal disease suggested alternative ways to deal with this disease. A new canine vaccine is underdevelopment by Pfizer to prevent this bacteria and subsequent periodontal disease. The vaccine is slated for release sometime mid 2006.

As I take oral health very seriously, I have made these recommendations to you and your pet not just to protect the fractured molar, but to give you a basis and a means to continue to protect the remainder of your pet's teeth for a lifetime!!

Please remember to press "ACCEPT" upon reading this answer. I appreciate your trust in my professional knowledge and clinical experience. Please remember to leave feedback, as feedback affects my ratings and earnings.

Best Wishes to You and Your Pet!
Dr. Jodi L. Smith

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