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Vet help
Vet help, Veterinarian
Category: Dog
Satisfied Customers: 2736
Experience:  12 years experience as small animal vet, 21 years experience in the animal care field
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MY DOG CANNOT STAND ON HIS HIND LEGS HE IS NOT MAKING ...

Resolved Question:

MY DOG CANNOT STAND ON HIS HIND LEGS HE IS NOT MAKING NOISE TO INDICATE PAIN , HIS HEAD IS TURNED ODDELY TO THE RIGHT DOWNWARD AND HIS EYES FLICKER HE IS REPSONSIVE , EATS AND WAGS HIS TAIL BUT THESE THINGS JUST STARTED TODAY
Submitted: 10 years ago via Vet.com.
Category: Dog
Expert:  Vet help replied 10 years ago.
HiCustomer Thank you for asking your question on Just Answer. The other experts and I are working on your answer. By the way, it would help us to know:

-How old is your dog?
-What breed is your dog?
-Does he have a history of ear infections?
-Are the eyes moving rapidly back and forth?

Thank you again for trusting us with your problem. Please reply as soon as possible so that we can finish answering your question.
Customer: replied 10 years ago.
Reply to RGK's Post: he is 14 chow and yes his eyes are moving back and forth
Expert:  Vet help replied 10 years ago.
Your dog is experiencing a vestibular problem, a disruption of the system that controls his balance. The wobbliness of the eyes is called nystagmus. Affected dogs typically have a head tilt, wobbly gait or difficulty getting up. They also have a tendency to fall or roll to one side and may experience nausea and vomiting because the world seems upside down.
Vestibular disease can have a few causes-
- Ear infections- a severe ear infection can cause problems with the vestibulocochlear nerve.
Worth having your vet rule out but if your dog has no history of ear infections it's less likely.
- Idiopathic "old dog" vestibular disease- idiopathic means no one knows the cause. Some people believe that this is the result of a stroke, but there has been no evidence to show that this is the case. This is likely what is going on with your dog.
- Brain lesions, like inflammation or tumor. These are uncommon in dogs and tumors, though rare, would most often be found in older dogs.

Aside from having your vet rule out an ear infection, the most important treatment for this condition is nursing care. If he becomes nauseaous, he will need something for the vomiting. He will need to have his food and water brought to him if he's unable to get up. He may need to be carried outside if he's unable to get up on his own, and he may need puppy training pads to lay on if he has an accident.
The good news about old dog vestibular disease is that they do recover. Some dogs recover fully, others have a residual head tilt that causes no problems. It may take up to 2 weeks for him to get back to himself.
I hope the information was helpful.
Vet help and 6 other Dog Specialists are ready to help you