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nekovet
nekovet, Cat Veterinarian
Category: Cat
Satisfied Customers: 16235
Experience:  Hello, I am a small animal veterinarian. I am happy to answer any questions you may have on any species.
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He's not eating or drinking. He will like the canned food

Customer Question

He's not eating or drinking. He will like the canned food gravy. He slso isn't moving around much. His CBC came back good
JA: I'm sorry to hear that. Could be a lot of things that cause lethargy. The Veterinarian will know how to help the cat. What is the cat's name and age?
Customer: Cooper and he's about 12 years old.
JA: Is there anything else important you think the Veterinarian should know about Cooper?
Customer: He has been to the vet twice since
Submitted: 13 days ago.
Category: Cat
Expert:  nekovet replied 12 days ago.

Hello & welcome, I am Dr. B, a licensed veterinarian and I would like to help you today. I do apologize that your question was not answered before. Different experts come online at various times; I just came online, read about your wee one’s situation, and wanted to help.

Again I do apologize that my colleagues could not aid you sooner, but can you tell me:

How long has he had these signs?

Did his vet do any other tests? What treatments is he on?

Any gagging, retching, lip licking, drooling, vomiting, or diarrhea?

Any changes in his breathing or does he seem sore with his mouth?

Can he keep water down?

Are his gums pink or pale/white? Moist or sticky?

If you press on his belly, any discomfort, tenderness, or tensing?

Could he have eaten something he should not have (ie bones, toys, plants, chemicals, etc)?

Customer: replied 12 days ago.
It started about a week and a half ago. He doesn't show any discomfort any where. The vet gave him an antibiotic shot, cortisone shot and a B12 shot last Friday. We took him back on Wednesday, and ran a CBC count. Everything came back good, except his temperature was 103 on his gums but normal in his ear. His gums are medium to light pink. His breathing seems normal, however after we gave him water from a syringe, his breathing was a little labored. He's weighs 23.7 pounds. Thank you for any suggestions.
Expert:  nekovet replied 12 days ago.

Thank you,

Now I share your concern about Cooper.

Especially if he is so lethargic and weak from being off food that he cannot do normal kitty things. So, while its good that his bloods were normal (since that lets us rule our serious organ issues or metabolic disease), we just need to tread with care. Cats are not well designed to be off food for long and doing so can put them at risk of secondary liver issues (ie fatty liver syndrome) which can make it even harder to get them eating.

Now if he hasn’t responded to his vet’s broad spectrum treatment, we may need to discuss other options to break his fast. One angle I would strongly advise addressing is nausea. (Oral discomfort would be another but hopefully his vet’s examination has ruled that out). Elderly cats often will go off food due to this (even without vomiting) and the treatments used thus far could actually make that worse. Therefore, it’d be worth speaking to his vet about anti-nausea treatment (ie Cerenia, Metoclopramide, Zofran) or at least consider trying an OTC antacid. [ie Pepcid (More Info/Dose @http://www.petplace.com/article/drug-library/library/over-the-counter/famotidine-pepcid)] to see if we can get him eating. As well, since the cortisone hasn’t prompted him to eat with its appetite stimulating effects, you may want to see if his vet can try a stronger appetite stimulant (ie Mirtazapine, Cyproheptadine) with him.

Otherwise, we also need to tempt him to eat. Favorites are allowed but we can try tempting with light diet options like boiled chicken, boiled white fish, scrambled eggs, or meat baby food (garlic/onion free only). Alternatively, we may need start syringe feeding (or use a temporary feeding tube) to break his fast that way. If we need to do this, we’d want to use a calorie rich diet like Hill's A/D, Royal Canin Recovery, kitten food or Clinicare Canine/Feline Liquid Diet. All of these are critical care diets that are calorically dense, so a little goes a long way nutrition-wise

Overall, a wide range of agents could trigger the signs we are seeing. The bloods have ruled out systemic/organ issues but we’d be wary of a pancreatitis, gut infection, or possible intra-GI issue (ie blockage, mass, or an enlarged organ/mass in the abdomen compressing the gut). Therefore, we’d want to consider the above additional treatments to help settle his stomach, encourage him to eat, and/or get food into him so we can give his body the nutrients it needs to fight this and recover.

Please take care,

Dr. B.

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Expert:  nekovet replied 9 days ago.
Hi,
I'm just following up on our conversation about your pet. How is everything going?
Customer
Customer: replied 7 days ago.
We had to put him down. The X-ray showed that his intestines were knotted, his liver was misshapen, and a shadow by his pancreas. They said that at his age and condition, he probably wouldn't survive surgery. If only his Vet would have taken an X-ray, he wouldn't have suffered for a week. Thank you for your help.
Expert:  nekovet replied 7 days ago.

You are very welcome and thank you for the update,

Though I am very sorry to hear that Cooper had such severe changes present in his abdomen and that his vet didn't pick up on them before. Still, at least you were vigilant and did press them to look further and to ease his suffering when these were found.

Please take care, my thoughts are with you in this difficult time,

Dr. B.