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TexLaw, Attorney
Category: Personal Injury Law
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Experience:  Lead Personal Injury Trial Lawyer
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one more thing, I always read "under the color of law" which

Customer Question

one more thing, I always read "under the color of law" which i take to mean that they were acting as if they were authorized by the government. Would this apply to an agent pretending to be a private entity, but that actually has acted as an agent of the government? This is similar to the 7 year lawsuit of the EFF v. NSA - except that lawsuit is likely to go away as the supreme court rules the NSA can spy on us all legally. My lawsuit is not exactly the same as it involves a private entity that i cna prove has acted in ways the government cannot since they have to answer to constitutional protections, and private companie do not.
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: Personal Injury Law
Expert:  TexLaw replied 3 years ago.
"Under the color of law" means that an agent of the government is acting under what it believes is authorized by the law. So in your case this would not apply because the private entity is not acting under the color of law. It believes it is not a governmental entity.
Customer: replied 3 years ago.

thank you , i should just stick to the quasi relationship

Expert:  TexLaw replied 3 years ago.
Please let me know if you have any further questions. Please also kindly consider rating my answer positively so that I am compensated by the website for my work on your question. Rating positively does not cause an additional charge and does not prevent us from further discussing your questions.

Best Regards,

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