How JustAnswer Works:

  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.

Ask Tim's Auto Repair Your Own Question

Tim's Auto Repair
Tim's Auto Repair, mechanic
Category: Nissan
Satisfied Customers: 13012
Experience:  Have owned a repair shop for 25 yrs.
14541291
Type Your Nissan Question Here...
Tim's Auto Repair is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

hi jim, i jumped a gear on the oil pump/ distributor spindle

Resolved Question:

hi jim, i jumped a gear on the oil pump/ distributor spindle when replacing my oil pump throwing off the timing. i forgot to set it at top dead center before removing the oil pump. the distributor moved i guess when i put the new pump in. now the hanes manual says there is a notch on the crank. mine has a series of dots on the front of the balancer around TDC no notch can be found. where is top dead center on no 1 cylinder with this engine. it is an 86 720 engine in a 86 d21 with all injection and smog components switched. is the first hole matcing up with the 0 on the pointer TDC. . i lined up the last hole on the balancer and it didnt run. ill be trying the first hole tomorrow morning. any help on finding TDC on this engine.
i also need the procedure for adjusting the throttle position sensor as well as the procedure for the coolant temp sensor test. on the 86 d21 throttle body system.
Submitted: 4 years ago.
Category: Nissan
Expert:  Tim's Auto Repair replied 4 years ago.

hi

jim don't seem to be online..

 

you need to take out the #1 plug,,,hold your finger on the plug hole...have your help to bump the starter till you feel air[compression]start to come out of the hole....then hand turn the engine until the mark on the harmonic balancer is on [o]..now you have the #1 piston up on the compression stroke...now,install the distributer to where the rotor is pointing to the #1 plug wire terminal...now it is in time.....when doing this,sense the gear will turn with the oil pump..just put 2 bolts in the pump so you can remove it easy till you get everything aligned up....this is a little slow..but you will get it

 

 

 

1986-88 FUEL INJECTED ENGINES

 

When checking ignition timing on air conditioner equipped trucks, make sure that the air conditioner is OFF when proceeding with the check. Refer to Idle Speed And Mixture Adjustments.


CAUTION Automatic transmission equipped models should be shifted into D for idle speed checks. When in Drive, the parking brake must be fully applied with both front and rear wheels chocked. When racing the engine on automatic transmission equipped models, make sure that the shift lever is in the N or P position.

  1. Run the engine until it reaches normal operating temperature.
  2. Open the hood, and race the engine at 2000 rpm for about 2 minutes under no-load (all accessories OFF ).
  3. Run the engine at idle speed.
  4. Race the engine two or three times under no-load, then run the engine for one minute at idle.
  5. Check the idle speed. Adjust the idle speed to specifications by turning the idle speed adjusting screw. Refer to the Tune Up Specifications Chart.
  6. Connect a timing light according to the light manufacturer's instructions. Adjust the timing by loosening the distributor hold-down bolts and turning the distributor clockwise to advance and counterclockwise to retard.
  7. Recheck timing after tightening the hold-down bolt to assure it did not change while tightening the bolt.

FIG : Fig. 4: 1981-88 Z20, Z22, Z24 and Z24i Engines Engine firing order: 1-3-4-2 Distributor rotation: counterclockwise

image

Distributor

  • INSTALLATION

See Figures 1 to 14REMOVAL

To remove the distributor, proceed in the following order:

  1. Unfasten the retaining clips and lift the distributor cap straight off. It will be easier to install the distributor if the wiring is left connected to the cap. If the wires must be removed from the cap, mark their positions to aid in installation.
  2. Remove the dust cover and mark the position of the rotor relative to the distributor body; then mark the position of the body relative to the block.
  3. Disconnect the coil primary wire and the vacuum lines, mark which is which for installation.
  4. Remove the pinch-bolt and lift the distributor straight out, away from the engine. The rotor and body are marked so that they can be returned to the position from which they were removed. Do not turn or disturb the engine (unless absolutely necessary, such as for engine rebuilding), after the distributor has been removed.
  5. FIG : Fig. 5: Exploded view of the distributor-1981-86 Z20, Z22 and Z24 engines

    image

  6. FIG : Fig. 6: Exploded view of the distributor-1986-88 Z24i engines

    image

  7. Oil Pump

    • REMOVAL & INSTALLATION

    REMOVAL & INSTALLATION

    See Figures 4, 5 and 6

    All Four Cylinder Gasoline Engines

    See Figures 1, 2 and 3

    The oil pump is mounted externally on the engine, eliminating the need to remove the oil pan in order to remove the oil pump.

    1. Remove the distributor.
    2. Drain the engine oil.
    3. Remove the front stabilizer bar.
    4. Remove the splash shield board.
    5. Loosen the mounting bolts and remove the oil pump body with the drive spindle assembly.


    To install:

    1. Before installing the oil pump in the engine, turn the crankshaft so that the No. 1 piston is at TDC of the compression stroke.
    2. Fill the pump housing with engine oil, then align the punch mark on the spindle with the hole in the oil pump.
    3. With a new gasket placed over the drive spindle, install the oil pump and drive spindle assembly so that the projection on the top of the drive spindle is located in the 11:25 o'clock position (between 11 and 12 o'clock).
    4. Install the distributor with the metal tip of the rotor pointing toward the No. 1 spark plug tower of the distributor cap.
    5. Install the splash shield and front stabilizer bar.
    6. Refill the engine with oil. Start the engine, check ignition timing and check for oil leaks.




    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 1: Removing the oil pump-4-cylinder gasoline engines



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 2: Aligning the punch mark on the spindle with the hole in the oil pump-4-cylinder gasoline engines



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 3: The projection on the top of the oil pump, drive spindle located in the 11:25 O'clock position. The smaller crescent formed by the notch faces forward-4-cylinder gasoline engines



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 4: Removing the oil pump assembly



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 5: Removing the oil pump mounting gasket



    Click image to see an enlarged view

    Fig. Fig. 6: View of the oil pump gear and drive spindle

Customer: replied 4 years ago.
well when i was cranking over and it backfired and did some fired at the wrong time i think i blew a head gasket or some valves. hopefully it is not ruined, but its down for the count. I've only got 30 psi compression for cyl 1,2,3. 90 psi for number 4. i'm gong to do the oil test tomorrow. hopefully its not the piston rings.
The engine had fluctuating oil pressure when cold. thats why i changed the oil pump. after done it started with good oil pressure ran rough like it was missing on a piston. thought i jumped the gear so i messed with that for a while. it seemed to have compression until after a couple of bad misfires. then it didnt seem to have resistance to the starter. so hence the compression test.
well i am going to see i its fixable. it never had oil pressure drop too low, so i wonder what happened. it ran fine before. Ugg. this is frustrating. i'm going to test again tomorrow. ill accept your answer i;m hoping you could chime in again if you dont mind.
Expert:  Tim's Auto Repair replied 4 years ago.

it may have jumped time on the chain

thanks

Customer: replied 4 years ago.
do you have any info on checking that. there is a mark on the cam or cam washer right it should line up with tdc. i should be able to find info in the hanes manual but its limited. thats not good news bent valves and possibly bad pistons too. i knew it wouldnt be good. thanks
Expert:  Tim's Auto Repair replied 4 years ago.

hi

the valves wont hit the pistons on this engine...it should be ok.......this may help

thanks

 

FIG : Fig. 3: Timing chain and sprocket alignment-Z20, Z22, Z24 and Z24i engines

image

 

Timing Chain and Tensioner

  • REMOVAL & INSTALLATION
  • TIMING CHAIN ADJUSTMENT

 

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



All 4 Cylinder Gasoline Engines

See Figures 1 thru 18

  1. Before beginning any disassembly procedures, position the No. 1 piston at TDC on the compression stroke.
  2. Remove the timing chain cover. Remove the cylinder head cover.
  3. With the No. 1 piston at TDC, the timing marks on the camshaft sprocket and the timing chain should be visible. Mark both of them with paint. Also mark the relationship of the camshaft sprocket to the camshaft. At this point you will see that there are three sets of timing marks and locating holes in the sprocket. They are for making adjustments to compensate for timing chain stretch. See the Timing Chain Adjustment section following for details.
  4. With the timing marks on the camshaft sprocket clearly marked, locate and mark the timing marks on the crankshaft sprocket. Also mark the chain timing mark. Of course, if the chain is not to be reused, marking it is useless.
  5. Unbolt the camshaft sprocket and remove the sprocket along with the chain. As you remove the chain, hold it where the chain tensioner contacts it. When the chain is removed, the tensioner is going to come apart. Hold on to it and you won't lose any of the parts! The crankshaft sprocket can be removed with a puller, if necessary. There is no need to remove the chain guide unless it is being replaced.


To install:

  1. Install the timing chain and the camshaft sprocket together after first positioning the chain over the crankshaft sprocket. Position the sprocket so that the marks made previously line up. This is assuming that the engine has not been disturbed. The camshaft and the crankshaft keys should both be pointing upward. If a new chain and/or gear is being installed, position the sprocket so that the timing marks on the chain align with the marks on the sprocket (with both keys pointing up). The marks are on the right hand side of the sprockets as you face the engine. 1970-73 L16 and L18 engines have 42 pins between the mating marks of the chain and sprockets when the chain is installed correctly. 1974-80 L18 and L20B engines have 44 pins.

 

The factory refers to the pins as links, but in American terminology this is incorrect. Count the pins. There are two (2) pins per chain link. This is an important step! If you do not get the exact number of pins between the timing marks, valve timing will be incorrect, and the engine will either not run at all or will run very badly.

Z20, Z22, Z24 and Z24i engines do not use the pin counting method for finding correct valve timing. Instead, set the timing chain by aligning its mating marks with those of the crankshaft sprocket and camshaft sprocket. The camshaft sprocket should be installed by fitting the knock pin of the camshaft into its No. 2 hole. And the No. 2 timing mark must also be used.

  1. Install the camshaft sprocket bolt and tighten it to 87-116 ft. lbs. (118-157 Nm).
  2. Install the chain guide and tensioner. Adjust the protrusion of the chain tensioner spindle to zero clearance. Tighten the bolts to 4-7 ft. lbs. (6-10 Nm).
  3. With a new seal installed in the timing chain cover and a light coat of oil applied to the seal, install the timing cover. Start the engine and check for any leaks. Check the ignition timing.

FIG : Fig. 1: Crankshaft sprocket removal-all 4-cylinder gasoline engines

image

FIG : Fig. 4: Installing the timing chain tensioner-all 4-cylinder gasoline engines

image

: Fig. 5: Crankshaft sprocket installation-Z20, Z22, Z24 and Z24i engines

image

Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 6: Removing the camshaft gear retaining bolt



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 7: View of the camshaft gear retaining bolt



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 8: Removing the camshaft gear and timing chain



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 9: Removing the timing chain tensioner mounting bolts



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 10: View of the timing chain tensioner assembly



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 11: Removing the timing chain assembly oil thrower



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 12: Removing the oil pump drive gear



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 13: Marking the oil pump drive gear for correct installation



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 14: Marking the timing chain if necessary



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 15: Removing the crankshaft sprocket



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 16: Removing the timing chain guide bolt



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 17: Removing the timing chain guide



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 18: Cleaning the timing chain case cover area

TIMING CHAIN ADJUSTMENT



L16, L18 and L20B Engines

When the timing chain stretches excessively, the valve timing will be adversely affected. There are two camshaft sprocket locating holes provided to correct the valve timing. Actually there are three sets of holes and timing marks on the camshaft sprocket; the third hole and timing mark are for 6 cylinder Datsun engines and in the case of the Datsun pick-ups, these are obviously ignored.

If the stretch of the chain roller links is excessive, adjust the camshaft sprocket location by transferring the camshaft set position of the camshaft sprocket from the factory position of the No. 1 to the No. 2 as follows:

  1. Turn the crankshaft until the No. 1 piston is at TDC on its compression stroke. Examine whether the camshaft sprocket location notch is to the left of the oblong groove on the camshaft retaining plate. If the notch in the sprocket is to the left of the groove in the retaining plate, then the chain is stretched and needs to be adjusted.
  2. Remove the camshaft sprocket and timing chain, then reinstall the sprocket and chain. Make sure the locating dowel on the camshaft is inserted into the No. 2 hole of the sprocket and the timing mark on the timing chain is aligned with the No. 2 marks on the sprocket. The amount of modification is 4 degrees of crankshaft rotation.
  3. Recheck the valve timing as outlined in Step 1. The notch in the sprocket should be to the right of the groove in the camshaft retaining plate.
  4. If and when the notch cannot be brought to the right of the groove with the sprocket installed in the No. 2 hole, the timing chain must be replaced to regain the proper valve timing.

Tim's Auto Repair, mechanic
Category: Nissan
Satisfied Customers: 13012
Experience: Have owned a repair shop for 25 yrs.
Tim's Auto Repair and 8 other Nissan Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 4 years ago.
cool man thanks for the help.
Expert:  Tim's Auto Repair replied 4 years ago.

you are welcome

thanks for using justanswer

JustAnswer in the News:

 
 
 
Ask-a-doc Web sites: If you've got a quick question, you can try to get an answer from sites that say they have various specialists on hand to give quick answers... Justanswer.com.
JustAnswer.com...has seen a spike since October in legal questions from readers about layoffs, unemployment and severance.
Web sites like justanswer.com/legal
...leave nothing to chance.
Traffic on JustAnswer rose 14 percent...and had nearly 400,000 page views in 30 days...inquiries related to stress, high blood pressure, drinking and heart pain jumped 33 percent.
Tory Johnson, GMA Workplace Contributor, discusses work-from-home jobs, such as JustAnswer in which verified Experts answer people’s questions.
I will tell you that...the things you have to go through to be an Expert are quite rigorous.
 
 
 

What Customers are Saying:

 
 
 
  • I was in trouble with an electrical issue with my brand new Nissan. I frantically went online trying to find help and luckily I found your site. I reached a NISSAN tech named RIP. He was absolutely tremendous and helped me work through the issue. What a pro! cjaz Lexington, KY
< Last | Next >
  • I was in trouble with an electrical issue with my brand new Nissan. I frantically went online trying to find help and luckily I found your site. I reached a NISSAN tech named RIP. He was absolutely tremendous and helped me work through the issue. What a pro! cjaz Lexington, KY
  • I would (and have) recommend your site to others I was quite satisfied with the quality of the information received, the professional with whom I interacted, and the quick response time. Thanks, and be sure that I'll be back whenever I need a question answered in a hurry. Stephanie P Elm City, NC
  • used your service this weekend with "Trecers" help. thank you ,thank you, thank you. replaced an A/C fan motor. Local Auto Zone had part. $15.00 "tracer" fee and $40.00 for parts, I saved several hundreds of dollers at a shop. i will recommend you and use you in the future. David L. Richmond, TX
  • 9 dollars, 2 hours of my time, and I drove away. Your diagnosis was right on the mark. Thank you so much. Phil Marysville, CA
  • Lurch. Thank you very much. I had real doubts about this website but your promptness of response, quick followup and to the point answer with picture was incredible. Charles Walnut Creek, CA
  • As a single woman, I really appreciate an excellent and affordable opinion.
    Thank you Geordie, I will not hesitate to contact justanswer in the future!
    Sue Charleston, WV
  • Another great insight to what may be the problem. I will have my mechanic take a look at it tomorrow. Thanks again, Frank...you do indeed know your stuff. Jim Castleberry, FL
 
 
 

Meet The Experts:

 
 
 
  • Tim Mohr

    ASE MASTER TECH

    Satisfied Customers:

    446
    30 YRS EXPERIENCE, FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC, GAS AND DEISEL
< Last | Next >
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/tsmodie/2009-6-10_144056_tim.jpg Tim Mohr's Avatar

    Tim Mohr

    ASE MASTER TECH

    Satisfied Customers:

    446
    30 YRS EXPERIENCE, FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC, GAS AND DEISEL
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/CA/caprio23/2011-12-13_155550_20111213105344.64x64.jpg Anthony's Avatar

    Anthony

    ASE Certified Technician

    Satisfied Customers:

    306
    ASE Master Automobile Technician with over 18 years exp. in this field.
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/FO/fordguy4u/2011-12-17_222940_HPIM1257.64x64.JPG Ron's Avatar

    Ron

    ASE Certified Technician

    Satisfied Customers:

    171
    34 years of automotive Repair
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/MU/muddyford/2012-6-13_1204_1.64x64.png Chris(aka-Moose)'s Avatar

    Chris(aka-Moose)

    Nissan Technician

    Satisfied Customers:

    165
    16 years of experience
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/EU/eurotec/2012-6-11_13153_mpjaphoto.64x64.JPG Marty's Avatar

    Marty

    ASE Certified Technician

    Satisfied Customers:

    127
    ASE & Bosch master tech. 30 years experience.
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/BA/baddad1/2013-8-30_131413_11848761610058140852271553042976n.64x64.jpg Mike V.'s Avatar

    Mike V.

    Nissan Technician

    Satisfied Customers:

    7443
    Nissan factory trained and Certified Subaru Technician.
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/CR/crzydrvr00/2013-11-3_12123_246347.64x64.jpg Richard's Avatar

    Richard

    ASE Certified Technician

    Satisfied Customers:

    92
    Nissan Tech ASE certified technician