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autodoc_2000
autodoc_2000, ASE Master Technician W/Advanced En
Category: Nissan
Satisfied Customers: 2563
Experience:  15 Years experience working on foreign automobiles
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Replacing both axels and tie rods

Resolved Question:

replacing both axels and tie rods
Submitted: 6 years ago.
Category: Nissan
Expert:  autodoc_2000 replied 6 years ago.
REMOVAL & INSTALLATION

See Figures 1 through 17

WARNING If the vehicle is going to be removed while the halfshafts are out of the vehicle, use 2 outer CV joints and install them in the hubs to obtain the proper torque to the front wheel bearings. Rolling the vehicle without outer CV joints installed will destroy the front wheel bearings. Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 1: This cracked CV joint boot has allowed most of the grease to escape; if not replaced promptly, the CV joint will quickly fail

To remove the left halfshaft on vehicles equipped with an automatic transaxle, the right halfshaft must be removed first.

Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 2: The left halfshaft has to be drifted out of the transaxle
  1. Raise and safely support the vehicle.
  2. Remove the wheel.
  3. Remove the locknut that attaches the outer CV joint.
Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 3: Straighten the cotter pin and pull it out ... Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 4: ... and remove the adjusting cap and insulator Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 5: Use a large prybar to hold the hub in place while loosening the nut Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 6: When installing the halfshaft, be sure to lubricate the washer with oil to obtain a proper torque reading

The brake caliper does not need to be removed to perform this service. Do not twist or stretch the brake hose when moving components.

  1. Disconnect the lower suspension arm from the wheel hub by unbolting the ball joint.

Later models use a unified lower ball joint/suspension arm assembly. The ball joint can be separated from the wheel hub by tapping a hammer on the area where the ball joint is mounted to the hub (after the bolt is removed) while applying downward force to the suspension arm. If the ball joint will not pop out, the use of a ball joint separator is recommended.

Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 7: The ball joint is attached to the suspension arm by three bolts which are unified with a plate Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 8: After the ball joint is removed from the suspension arm, the wheel hub and caliper assembly can be pulled away
  1. Separate the halfshaft from the knuckle by tapping it lightly. If it is hard to remove, a halfshaft removal tool can be mounted on the wheel studs to press the halfshaft from the hub.
Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 9: Use a punch to tap the outer CV joint from the hub. Do not hit it directly with a hammer; the threads will be distorted Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 10: The halfshaft can now be removed from the vehicle
  1. If removing the right halfshaft, remove the bolts securing the support bearing.
  2. Carefully pry the support bearing out of its housing. The support bearing will not fully slide out of its housing until the halfshaft is removed from the transaxle.
Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 11: Carefully remove the support bearing from the bracket Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 12: Apply anti-seize compound to the support bearing to prevent rust build-up Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 13: Using a wire brush, clean any surface rust build-up from the bearing ... Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 14: ... and the support bracket
  1. Remove the halfshafts from the transaxle by gently prying them from the housing.
  2. On automatic transaxles, the left halfshaft should be removed by using a suitable tool as shown in the illustration. Use caution when performing this procedure, as the gear and pinion mate shaft are easily damaged.
Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 15: Example of a fully assembled right halfshaft. Note the extra length to compensate for the offset mounting of the transaxle Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 16: This seal on the transaxle is leaking; while the halfshaft is removed, replacement is recommended Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 17: The front wheel bearing seal is pressed into the wheel hub and can be changed separately of the bearingTo install:
  1. Using an oil seal cover tool to protect the inner diameter of the oil seal, install the halfshafts.
  2. Properly align the serrations and then withdraw the oil seal cover tool.
  3. Push on the halfshaft to press the circlip on the halfshaft into the groove on the side gear.
  4. After inserting the halfshaft, attempt to gently pull the halfshaft out of the transaxle. If it pulls out, the circlip is not properly meshed with the side gear.
  5. If installing the right halfshaft, tighten the bolts holding the support bearing.
  6. Connect the tie rod ball joint.
  7. Connect the lower ball joint to the suspension arm with the three bolts. Tighten the bolts to 56-80 ft. lbs. (118-147 Nm.)
  8. The ball joint nut on later models should be tightened to 46-56 ft. lbs. (62-76 Nm.).
  9. Install the wheel bearing locknut. Tighten the locknut to 174-231 ft. lbs. (235-314 Nm).
  10. Install the wheel.
  11. Lower the vehicle.
CV-JOINT OVERHAUL

See Figure 18

Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 18: Exploded view of the halfshafts and related components

Transaxle Side

See Figures 19, 20 and 21

  1. Remove the boot bands.
  2. Matchmark the slide joint housing and inner race, prior to separating the joint assembly.
Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 19: The inner CV joint uses a large C-clip to retain the ball and cage assembly in the outer housing Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 20: After the outer housing is removed, the ball and cage assembly can slide from the shaft by removing the C-clip
  1. Pry off the snap ring and remove the ball cage, inner race and balls as a unit.
  2. Remove the snap ring and withdraw the boot.
  3. The right halfshaft uses a support bearing with a longer inner CV joint to compensate for the offset of the transaxle. Removing the support bearing from the halfshaft requires a press. Do not attempt to hammer the bearing from the halfshaft.
To assemble:

Cover the halfshaft serrations with tape, so as not to damage the boot.

  1. Throughly clean all parts in solvent and dry with compressed air. Check parts for evidence of damage, and replace as necessary.
  2. Install the boot and new boot band on the halfshaft.
Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 21: Make sure to properly position the boot before tightening the boot clamps
  1. Install a new inner snap ring.
  2. Install the ball cage, inner race and balls as a unit. Confirm that the matchmarks are aligned.
  3. Install a new outer snap ring.
  4. Pack the CV joint with 5.0-6.0 ounces of grease.
  5. Ensure that the boot is properly installed on the halfshaft groove.
  6. Set the boot so that it does not swell or deform when its length is 3.82-3.90 in. (97-99mm).
  7. Lock the new boot bands securely.
Wheel Side

See Figures 22 and 23

The joint on the wheel side cannot be disassembled.

  1. Prior to separating the joint assembly, matchmark the halfshaft and joint assembly.
  2. Separate the joint using a slide hammer.
  3. Remove the boot bands.
To assemble:
  1. Throughly clean all parts in solvent and dry with compressed air. Check parts for evidence of damage and replace as necessary.

Cover the halfshaft serrations with tape, so as not to damage the boot.

Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 22: Use vinyl tape and wrap the end of the shaft to protect the boot during installation
  1. Install the boot and small boot band on the halfshaft.
  2. Set the joint assembly onto the halfshaft and align the matchmarks.
  3. Attach the joint assembly to the halfshaft by lightly tapping the serrated end with a plastic hammer.
Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 23: Use an old nut to protect the threads when tapping the outer CV joint onto the shaft

Using a metal hammer may damage the threads on the end of the joint.

  1. Pack the CV joint with 3.5-4.0 ounces of grease.
  2. Ensure that the boot is properly installed on the halfshaft groove.
  3. Set the boot so that it does not swell or deform when its length is 3.327-3.406 in. (84.5-86.5mm).
  4. Lock the new boot bands securely.
Support Bearing

See Figures 24 and 25

  1. Remove the dust shield.
  2. Remove the snap ring.
  3. Press the support bearing assembly from the halfshaft using a hydraulic press and the appropriate adapters.
Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 24: Driving the new bearing into the retainer Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 25: After the bearing is installed into the retainer, install it onto the shaft with a press
  1. Separate the support bearing from the retainer using a bearing driver.

 

 

To assemble:

  1. Throughly clean all parts in solvent and dry with compressed air. Check the parts for evidence of damage.
  2. Ensure that the wheel bearing rolls freely and is free from noise, cracks, pitting and wear.
  3. Check the support bearing bracket for cracks, and replace as necessary.
  4. Install the bearing into the retainer using a bearing driver.
  5. Press the support bearing onto the shaft using a hydraulic press.
  6. Install the new snap ring.
  7. Install the new dust shield.

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION

See Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6

  1. Raise the front of the vehicle and support it on jackstands. Remove the wheel.
  2. Remove the cotter pin and the tie rod ball joint stud nut. Note the position of the steering linkage.

Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 1: View of the steering gear and tie rods Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 2: Loosen the locknuts from the steering gear Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 3: Matchmark the position of the tie rod Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 4: Remove the cotter pin and loosen the nut ...

  1. Loosen the tie rod-to-steering gear locknut.
  2. Using a suitable ball joint separator tool remove the tie rod ball joint from the steering knuckle.
  3. Loosen the locknut and remove the tie rod end from the tie rod, counting the number of complete turns it takes to completely free it.

Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 5: ... then break the tie rod taper from the knuckle. Leave the nut on to protect the threads Click image to see an enlarged viewFig. 6: Count the number of turns to remove the tie rod

To install:

  1. Install the new tie rod end, turning it in exactly as far as you screwed out the old one. Make sure it is correctly positioned in relationship to the steering linkage.
  2. Fit the ball joint and nut, tighten them and install a new cotter pin. Torque the ball joint stud nut to specifications. Check front end alignment.
  3. The outer tie rod end-to-steering knuckle torque specification is 22-29 ft. lbs. (29-39 Nm.).

Always replace the cotter pins and if necessary replace the retaining nut.

  1. Check and adjust the front end alignment as necessary.
autodoc_2000, ASE Master Technician W/Advanced En
Category: Nissan
Satisfied Customers: 2563
Experience: 15 Years experience working on foreign automobiles
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