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Chris The Lawyer
Chris The Lawyer, Lawyer
Category: New Zealand Law
Satisfied Customers: 22320
Experience:  37 years qualified as a lawyer; LLB, MMgt and FAMINZ.
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More of a legal office protocol thing. A year ago, on a

Customer Question

More of a legal office protocol thing. A year ago, on a short trip, I needed a safekeeping place for important documents. I gave those documents to my local law office, but when I asked for a receipt, they said they don't do that sort of thing--give receipts for the holding of documents--in New Zealand. But I had to sign before taking the documents away! Is this just a local practice amongst law firms? What are my protections if, for example, my birth certificate or land title is missing?Thanks.
Submitted: 23 days ago.
Category: New Zealand Law
Expert:  Chris The Lawyer replied 23 days ago.

I dont believe there is a standard practice, although all firms I have known keep a deeds register, which lists documents held for each client. This is a requirement of good practice, and the Lawyers and Conveyencers Rules. As for recepts going into storage, that is not usually done, but as there is a requirement to keep a register of the documents, when they are removed the receipt shows this. Title deeds are now entirely electronic, but wills and deeds are still paper and important and should be recordede in the register.

Customer: replied 23 days ago.
Thanks.
Expert:  Chris The Lawyer replied 23 days ago.

I hope this helps

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