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Dr. Muneeb Ali
Dr. Muneeb Ali, Intensivist
Category: Neurology
Satisfied Customers: 3191
Experience:  Experience of Neurology of over 4 years, well versed in EEG, NCS and EMG alongwith MRIs and CT scans
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My husband has a story of seizures. Not many, less than 10

Customer Question

My husband has a history of seizures. Not many, less than 10 and they presented themselves in his late teens to present (28). His early 20s he had his nipple pierced -I know- and later that evening he seized. I wasn't with him at the time to witness if he convulsed or not. Several others prior to had lasted about 10-15 seconds with his mother at side and as far as I'm aware he had convulsed but no vomiting.
A stressful situation last year seemed to induce something. I can't say it was a seizure, he knew it was coming, similar feelings/warning signs and got on the ground in time to not hit from so far up (6'3") but he did thud like he had lost control; his eyes were open not rolled back and he curled up and locked up. Lasted 10 seconds and then once he came to it took him a minute to figure out his surroundings. No shakes no convulsions, just still and stiff. No memory of it or telling me something was going to happen prior to.
Today he rolled his ankle badly moving a mattress down steps and seconds later with signs he recognized told his buddy something was going to happen and he dropped. He hadn't told me until after everyone left so I'm unaware if it was a seizure or a black out. He did mention Tyler tried to pick him up but he was heavy so I'm assuming he wasn't seizing. Just unsure if it was a faint or a lock up. Am I wrong to assume a black out is more of a faint and loose fall rather than the lock up eyes open situation I experienced last year? Is it common for these situations, pain physically or emotionally, to induce these types of conditions? He's stubborn and won't be seen so I'm reaching, just trying to understand. His ankle is badly sprained but not broken. Still that's painful enough to do it if a piercing could.
Aside from that he's perfectly healthy. Diet was well maintained today. Hydrated. And takes no medication. Never has for the seizures in the past either.
Submitted: 8 months ago.
Category: Neurology
Customer: replied 8 months ago.
He had his license revoked temporarily after his episodes but hasn't since. I'm assuming that's part of what's holding him back from being seen. They don't happen randomly though which I find odd, unless that's more common than I think? He's not heavy, I don't know if an unhealthy lifestyle can contribute but he's 6'3" and only 160 max. Just heavy for Tyler.. Dead weight isn't easy. I'm sure if he was worried he would have said something before he left. I just don't want to overlook this. He seems fine. No headache just tired afterwards, we've been moving so I can't say he was extra fatigued from the episode, he'd been at it all day. Should I be more worried about the episodes than I am? Forcing a doctors visit?
Expert:  Dr. Muneeb Ali replied 8 months ago.

Hi Carrie,

Im sorry to hear about your husband. But from what you are describing he is definitely having seizures, they are just not tonic clonic seizures in which his limbs would be moving in an unnatural manner however it is certainly posssible that he is having a TONIC seizure in which there is generalized stiffness of the muscles and his muscles would lock for a period of time. there is just increased tone of the muscles in such a situation. Now the frequency of these seizures indicates that they are usually set off when he is under some sort of stress. Usually there are various stimuli for them to be set off which can include loud noises, flashing lights, pain or even stress. Now this DOES need to be evaluated by a neurologist and your husband needs to undergo several tests which would include an EEG, a MRI of the brain as well as a complete metabolic work up.

You should be worried about these symptoms and you should make him go see a doctor, preferably a neurologist. At the same he can also have a look at his heart and do a EKG and possibly a 24 hour holter monitor to rule out irregular heart beat as the cause of his seizures.

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Expert:  Dr. Muneeb Ali replied 8 months ago.

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Expert:  Dr. Muneeb Ali replied 8 months ago.

Do you have any more questions?

If you are satisfied, Please leave a POSITIVE rating by clicking on the stars below, until you do i am not compensated for my time. You can continue to ask follow-up questions even after the POSITIVE rating.