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Dr. Mark
Dr. Mark, Neurologist (MD)
Category: Neurology
Satisfied Customers: 11946
Experience:  Neurosurgeon - Brain, spine, and peripheral nerve surgery
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My husband Alfred (age 53), was recently in the hospital for

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My husband Alfred (age 53), was recently in the hospital for leg cramping. He was then given an MRI and CT scan since the doctors observed his responses to questions were slow or he just couldn't remember. His primary physician indicated he may be having early dementia and referred him to a neurologist. As his spouse I am terrified just thinking of his condition. His long term memory is OK, but sometimes he forgets current events... How worried should I be until we get to the specialist???

Hello.

 

Please try not to be worried too much. You mention that he sometimes forgets current events, and that is probably normal for most people.

 

Sometimes is much different than all the time -- where people with dementia are, as they have trouble with their cognition all of the time.

 

At 53, it would be very unusual to have any significant dementia. But certainly, seeing a neurologist for evaluation is helpful, as they will do bloodwork, review the imaging studies, and do a neurologic exam to see if there are potential medical issues (this is called a "dementia workup") which cna cause memory issues.

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Customer: replied 4 years ago.

Does early demential, if diagnosed, lead to possible disability compensation?

Well, dementia can lead to disability, but whether or not it qualifies for disability compensation is a whole other matter. In many cases it would not, but this depends on the actual disability insurance or carrier's policies.